American Journal of Educational Research
ISSN (Print): 2327-6126 ISSN (Online): 2327-6150 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/education Editor-in-chief: Ratko Pavlović
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American Journal of Educational Research. 2017, 5(9), 944-951
DOI: 10.12691/education-5-9-3
Open AccessArticle

Learning with Each Other: Peer Learning as an Academic Culture among Graduate Students in Education

Gamal M. M. Mustafa1, 2,

1Department of Foundations of Education, Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt

2Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University (IMSIU), Riyadh, KSA

Pub. Date: September 27, 2017

Cite this paper:
Gamal M. M. Mustafa. Learning with Each Other: Peer Learning as an Academic Culture among Graduate Students in Education. American Journal of Educational Research. 2017; 5(9):944-951. doi: 10.12691/education-5-9-3

Abstract

The major objective of the present study is to examine the extent to which peer learning is common among graduate students in educational programs in Saudi universities. Moreover, it also investigates the obstacles which may hinder spreading the culture of peer learning, and the proposals to overcome such obstacles from the graduate students’ perspectives. Data were collected through an electronic questionnaire conducted to a sample of 375 of graduate students in educational programs in Saudi universities. The major findings of the study revealed majority of respondents (69%) agree and strongly agree to the items of the questionnaire, while (12.4%) disagree and strongly disagree, and (21%) were neutral. The most agreed upon items in part (1) are: “I do feel embarrassed to ask my peers for new knowledge and information” and “I feel happy with the comments of my peers on my research and work papers. The most agreed upon items in part (2) are: “Lack of non-classroom activities that support the culture of peer learning” and “Lack of equipped classrooms of graduate students that support peer learning”. The most agreed upon items in part (3) are: “Urging professors to support and supervise academic discussions among students” and “Encouraging students to attend the seminars when their peers present their research proposals”.

Keywords:
academic culture peer learning interactive learning graduate students Saudi universities

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