International Journal of Physics
ISSN (Print): 2333-4568 ISSN (Online): 2333-4576 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/ijp Editor-in-chief: B.D. Indu
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International Journal of Physics. 2021, 9(2), 96-113
DOI: 10.12691/ijp-9-2-5
Open AccessArticle

From the Contraction of Celestial Bodies to Their Shortest Rotation Period until the Heating of the Stars and the Universe Global Theory

José Luís Pereira Rebelo Fernandes1,

1Independent Researcher since 2005, Engineer, Graduated from the University of Porto

Pub. Date: March 18, 2021

Cite this paper:
José Luís Pereira Rebelo Fernandes. From the Contraction of Celestial Bodies to Their Shortest Rotation Period until the Heating of the Stars and the Universe Global Theory. International Journal of Physics. 2021; 9(2):96-113. doi: 10.12691/ijp-9-2-5

Abstract

Now we can deduct the variation of the atomic radius with the universal density of potential energy. We can look here and at “Ref. [4]”. In the same way as a lower ρ, gravitational radiation occurs more easily, so does electromagnetic radiation. With the decrease of ρ due to the expansion of the universe, the magnetic permeability of the vacuum U increases. Applying quantum mechanics, it turns out that the atomic radius varies in the inverse proportion of U, that is, in the inverse proportion of the expansion of the universe. Since all matter is made up of atoms, we conclude that matter in the future will shrink. This notion associated with the increase in G allows us to better understand the universal formation. The centers of mass due to the increase in G move away and the large amounts of mass made up of larger atoms shrink giving rise to the protostars that over time gave rise to the stars and their ignition as well as greater regiment to the planets and moons. The contraction of the rotating celestial bodies, among them the Earth, justifies the fact that the day is currently shorter, since the angular momentum will always be constant. Keeping the angular momentum indicates that if a mass that turns one day a day shrinks by half it will start to turn four times a day. The average increased surface speed of rotation will be proportional to the expansion of the universe. Heating of stars and universal heating. Now that we know about the contraction of atoms and, consequently, the contraction of celestial bodies, we have to admit that this process leads to its heating. Assuming that the temperature increases in proportion to the kinetic energy.

Keywords:
relativity space time dilation gravity gravitational speed density energy potential mass ligh galaxy

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