American Journal of Microbiological Research
ISSN (Print): 2328-4129 ISSN (Online): 2328-4137 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/ajmr Editor-in-chief: Apply for this position
Open Access
Journal Browser
Go
American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2015, 3(2), 62-64
DOI: 10.12691/ajmr-3-2-4
Open AccessArticle

Isolation and Molecular Identification of New Emergent Candida Lusitaniae Isolated from Sudanese Immunocompromised Patients Infected with Oropharyngeal Candidiasis

Mutaz F. Saad1, and Amr M. Albasha2

1Department of Clinical Laboratory, College of Applied medical sciences, Al Jouf University, Sakaka, Saudi Arabia

2Department of Microbiology, College of Medical laboratory, Sudan University of science and technology, Khartoum, Sudan

Pub. Date: March 22, 2015

Cite this paper:
Mutaz F. Saad and Amr M. Albasha. Isolation and Molecular Identification of New Emergent Candida Lusitaniae Isolated from Sudanese Immunocompromised Patients Infected with Oropharyngeal Candidiasis. American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2015; 3(2):62-64. doi: 10.12691/ajmr-3-2-4

Abstract

Seventy seven oral swab samples (n=77) were collected in period between august 2007 to may 2008 from hospitalized immunocompromised and HIV patients suspected for Oropharyngeal Candidiasis and admitted in different hospitals in Ed-wiuem state and Khartoum state, Sudan. All samples were inoculated on Sabouraud dextrose agar and identified by colonial morphology, Germ tube test and Vitek2 compact system for biochemical identification and antifungal susceptibility test. Out of 77 oral swab samples collected from immunocompromised and HIV patients, 41 (53.3%) samples showed positive growth of Candida, and 36 (46.7%) samples showed negative growth. The identification showed that out of forty one positive cultures, 32 isolates found as Candida albicans (78%), while nine samples (n=9) appeared as non-Candida albicans (22%) and found as Candida lusitaniae according to GTT and Vitek2 Compact identification. Then DNA was extracted from all non-Candida albicans isolates and DNA sequencing was carried and D1/D2 region were determined using NL1 primer. DNA based identification showed that all nine (n=9) GTT negative isolates were Candida lusitaniae (Anamorh Clavispora lusitaniae). This study documented that there are new emergent species of Candida should be considered when dealing with specimen collected from patients suspected for yeast infections. Our results provide useful information that C. lusitaniae can be isolated as well as other Candida species from immunocompromised patients in Sudan.

Keywords:
immunocompromised HIV C. lusitaniae DNA sequencing Sudan

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

References:

[1]  Blinkhorn, R. J., D. Adelstein, and P. J. Spagnuolo. 1989. Emergence of a new opportunistic pathogen, Candida lusitaniae. J. Clin. Microbiol. 27: 236-240.
 
[2]  Christenson, J. C., A. Guruswamy, G. Mukwaya, and P. Rettig. 1987. Candida lusitaniae: an emerging human pathogen. Pediatr. Infect. Dis. J. 6: 755-757.
 
[3]  Guinet, R., J. Chanas, A. Goullier, G. Bonnefoy, and P. Ambroise-Thomas. 1983. Fetal septicemia due to amphotericin B-resistant Candida lusitaniae. J. Clin. Microbiol. 18: 443-444.
 
[4]  Hadfield, T. L., M. B. Smith, R. E. Winn, M. G. Rinaldi, and C. Guerra. 1987. Mycosis caused by Candida lusitaniae. Rev. Infect. Dis. 9: 1006-1012.
 
[5]  Hazen, K. C. 1995. New and emerging yeast pathogens. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 8: 462-478.
 
[6]  Sanchez, V., J. A. Vazquez, D. Barth-Jones, L. Dembry, J. D. Sobel, and M. J.Zervos. 1992. Epidemiology of nosocomial acquisition of Candida lusitaniae. J. Clin. Microbiol. 30: 3005-3008.
 
[7]  Favel, A., Michel-Nguyen, A., Peyron, F. et al. (2003). Colony morphology switching of Candida lusitaniae and acquisition of multidrug resistance during treatment of a renal infection in a newborn: case-report and review of the literature. Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease 47, 331-9.
 
[8]  Pfaller, M. A., and D. J. Diekema. 2002. Role of sentinel surveillance of candidemia: trends in species distribution and antifungal susceptibility. J. Clin. Microbiol. 40: 3551-3557
 
[9]  Guinet, R., J. Chanas, A. Goullier, G. Bonnefoy, and P. Am-broise-Thomas (1983). Fatal septicemia due to amphotericin B-resistant Candida lusitaniae. J. Clin. Microbiol. 18: 443-444.
 
[10]  Merz, W. G., and G. R. Sandford (1979). Isolation and charac-terization of a polyene-resistant variant of Candida tropicalis. J. Clin. Microbiol. 9: 677-680.
 
[11]  Pappagianis, D., M. S. Collins, R. Hector, and J. Remington. (1979). Development of resistance to amphotericin B in Candida lusitaniae infecting a human. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 16: 123-126.
 
[12]  Holzschu, D. L., H. L. Presley, M. Miranda, and H. J. Phaff. (1979). Identification of Candida lusitaniae as an opportunistic yeast in humans. J. Clin. Microbiol. 10:202-205.
 
[13]  Van Uden, N., and H. Buckley. 1970. Candida Berkhout, p. 893-1087. In J. Lodder (ed.), The yeasts-a taxonomic study. North-Holland Publishing Co., Amsterdam.
 
[14]  Yoon, S. A., J. A. Vazquez, P. E. Steffan, J. D. Sobel, and R. A. Akins. 1999. High-frequency, in vitro reversible switching of Candida lusitaniae clinical isolates from amphotericin B susceptibility to resistance. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 43:836-845.
 
[15]  Nancy B. M., Haihua F., Ellen J. B.,1Ana C. G., Allison H., Richard J. H., and Michael A. Pfaller. (2002). Change in Colony Morphology of Candida lusitaniae in Association with Development of Amphotericin B Resistance. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 46: 1325-1328.