American Journal of Epidemiology and Infectious Disease
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American Journal of Epidemiology and Infectious Disease. 2015, 3(1), 15-20
DOI: 10.12691/ajeid-3-1-3
Open AccessArticle

Prevalence of Asymptomatic Malaria and Intestinal Helminthiasis Co-infection among Children Living in Selected Rural Communities in Ibadan Nigeria

Ikeoluwapo .O. Ajayi1, 2, Chinenye Afonne1, 2, , Hannah Dada-Adegbola2, 3 and Catherine .O. Falade2, 4

1Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

2Epidemiology and Biostatistics Research Unit, Institute of Advanced Medical Research &Training, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

3Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria

4Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

Pub. Date: March 25, 2015

Cite this paper:
Ikeoluwapo .O. Ajayi, Chinenye Afonne, Hannah Dada-Adegbola and Catherine .O. Falade. Prevalence of Asymptomatic Malaria and Intestinal Helminthiasis Co-infection among Children Living in Selected Rural Communities in Ibadan Nigeria. American Journal of Epidemiology and Infectious Disease. 2015; 3(1):15-20. doi: 10.12691/ajeid-3-1-3

Abstract

Malaria and Intestinal helminth parasites co-exist in the tropics due to prevailing climatic conditions and poor sanitary practices. These parasites have adverse effects on cognitive development, educational performance and school attendance of children. The epidemiology of these parasites and their co-infection among children have not been fully documented in Nigeria, community-based studies are limited. This study aims to highlight the burden of malaria parasites and intestinal helminths among children living in rural areas. A community-based cross-sectional study involving children aged 6 months - 14 years was carried out in six rural communities. Single stool and finger prick blood samples were collected. Wet mount and formol-ether techniques were employed to process stool samples for microscopy while Giemsa-stained thick blood smears were used to screen for Plasmodium. falciparum parasites. Overall prevalence of Plasmodium. falciparum asexual parasites, Intestinal helminth infections and malaria intestinal helminth co-infection were 52.3%, 35.9%, and 57.1% respectively. Ascaris lumbricoides was the only intestinal helminth species identified among the children. The prevalence of asexual Plasmodium.falciparum parasites significantly decreased with age (χ2 =15.05, p<0.001) and was highest among children aged 5 years and below (χ2 = 15.97, p<0.0001). Odds of Intestinal helminth infection were significantly higher among children above 5 years of age compared to those aged 5 years and below (OR = 1.97, CI = 1.03, 3.76). Prevalence of co-infection was least among the early adolescents (11-14 years) compared to the other age groups (χ2 = 16.16, p<0.0001). Intestinal helminth and its co-infection with malaria constitute a major health burden among children in rural Nigeria, however with differentials in age.

Keywords:
malaria intestinal helminth co-infections children prevalence

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