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Pedreschi F, Kaack K, Granby K. The effect of asparaginase on acrylamide formation in French fries. Food Chem 109: 386-392, 2008.

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Article

Calcium Salts Reduce Acrylamide Formation and Improve Qualities of Cookies

1Department of Food Science, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, R.O.C

2Center of Excellence for the Oceans, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, R.O.C.


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2014, Vol. 2 No. 11, 857-866
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-2-11-16
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Ke- Liang Bruce Chang, Jen-Shiang Wang, Wen-Chieh Sung. Calcium Salts Reduce Acrylamide Formation and Improve Qualities of Cookies. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2014; 2(11):857-866. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-2-11-16.

Correspondence to: Wen-Chieh  Sung, Department of Food Science, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, R.O.C. Email: sungwill@mail.ntou.edu.tw

Abstract

This study compares the effects of adding 0.1%, 0.5% and 1.0% of various calcium salts on the qualities of the model cookies, cookies, and their relation to the reducing sugar content. The highest inhibition of acrylamide formation is obtained by a 1.0% calcium carbonate fortification of the model cookies (60.47%). The formation of acrylamide shows a positive correlation with the reducing sugar concentration of these cookies. The reducing sugar of model cookies fortified with calcium carbonate shows the highest correlation with the acrylamide concentration (R2=0.99). The reducing sugar content of cookies has the greatest decrease (54%) with the addition of 1% calcium carbonate. The addition of calcium salts, except for calcium carbonate, has significant effect on the appearance and spread ratio of the cookies. The overall acceptability of the fortified cookies is significantly improved by the addition of 1% calcium carbonate.

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