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International Standards Organisation (ISO) 17604. Microbiology of Food and Animal Feeding Stuffs – Carcass Sampling for Microbiological Analysis, ISO, Geneva, Switzerland. 2003.

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Article

Assessment of Aerobic Plate Counts, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Salmonella in Meat Sold by Street Vendors in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

1Department of Livestock and Pasture Science, University of Fort Hare, Alice, South Africa

2Veterinary Laboratory, Department of Rural Development and Agrarian Reform, Grahamstown, South Africa


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2017, Vol. 5 No. 6, 436-442
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-5-6-11
Copyright © 2017 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
B.E. Mazizi, V. Muchenje, M. Makepe, G. Mutero. Assessment of Aerobic Plate Counts, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Salmonella in Meat Sold by Street Vendors in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2017; 5(6):436-442. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-5-6-11.

Correspondence to: B.E.  Mazizi, Department of Livestock and Pasture Science, University of Fort Hare, Alice, South Africa. Email: 201101708@ufh.ac.za

Abstract

The study was carried out to determine the aerobic plate counts (APC), Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Salmonella contamination levels in cooked (n=24) and raw (n=24) beef, pork and mutton samples, surface contact plates (n=48) and water samples (n= 40) from street vendors. A total of 8 street vendors who were willing to participate in the study were randomly selected. After biochemical tests, no significant differences were found in the microbial counts of meat sold by street vendors in Alice and King Williams town. Furthermore, no significant differences were found in the mean scores of raw beef, mutton and pork where APC (4.8, 3.7 and 2.8 Log CFU/g), Staphylococcus aureus (3.3, 3.7 and 2.8 Log CFU/g) and E. coli (1.0, 0.6 and 0.3 Log CFU/g) respectively. Salmonella tested negative in all the samples tested in the study. The results in the study were associated with cross-contamination during processing and storage. However, the levels of contamination in cooked meat were lower when compared to the standards set by Commission Regulation for determining the microbiological quality of ready-to-eat foods. Overall, poor hygiene of the street vendor, utensils, and holding area were major sources of contamination. It was therefore concluded that there were no differences in the microbial counts of meat sold in the informal markets of Nkonkobe and Buffalo City Municipalities in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Improved sanitation facilities, hygiene tools, and training will promote the production of safer food by the street vendors.

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