American Journal of Medical Case Reports
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American Journal of Medical Case Reports. 2021, 9(4), 208-212
DOI: 10.12691/ajmcr-9-4-1
Open AccessCase Report

Cancer of the Grave: A Rapidly Growing Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer with NRAS and TP53 Mutation: Molecular Understanding and Therapeutic Hopes

Hammam Shereef1, , Mohamedanwar Ghandour2, Mohamed Mustafa3, Ahmed Hashim1, Omar Nasser Rahal1, Jeremy Powers4, Ruaa Elteriefi1 and Faisal Musa5

1Department of Internal Medicine, Beaumont Hospital- Dearborn, Michigan, USA

2Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University/ Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, Michigan, USA

3Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Minnesota, USA

4Department of Clinical Pathology, Beaumont Hospital- Dearborn, Michigan, USA

5Division of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Beaumont Hospital- Dearborn, Michigan, USA

Pub. Date: January 18, 2021

Cite this paper:
Hammam Shereef, Mohamedanwar Ghandour, Mohamed Mustafa, Ahmed Hashim, Omar Nasser Rahal, Jeremy Powers, Ruaa Elteriefi and Faisal Musa. Cancer of the Grave: A Rapidly Growing Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer with NRAS and TP53 Mutation: Molecular Understanding and Therapeutic Hopes. American Journal of Medical Case Reports. 2021; 9(4):208-212. doi: 10.12691/ajmcr-9-4-1

Abstract

Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is the rarest form of thyroid cancer known to humans. Among the other thyroid neoplasms, ATC is the deadliest, with unified mortality of almost 100%. With the advances in thyroid ultrasounds and screening protocols, the incidence of ATC increases, which correlates with the increase in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) that is believed to be the precursor of most ATC. We herein describe a rare case of a 69-year-old Caucasian male with no known past medical or surgical histories who presented with a rapidly growing neck mass that was later confirmed as an undifferentiated anaplastic thyroid carcinoma with a mutation in NRAS and TP53 progressing in two months period into a complete seeding of lungs with metastasis. This case highlights the importance of studying and understanding thyroid oncogenesis's molecular aspects as recently targeted immunotherapy is promising for particular gene mutations by delaying this graving cancer progression.

Keywords:
Anaplastic thyroid cancer NRAS TP53

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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