American Journal of Epidemiology and Infectious Disease
ISSN (Print): 2333-116X ISSN (Online): 2333-1275 Website: https://www.sciepub.com/journal/ajeid Editor-in-chief: John Opuda-Asibo
Open Access
Journal Browser
Go
American Journal of Epidemiology and Infectious Disease. 2023, 11(1), 1-10
DOI: 10.12691/ajeid-11-1-1
Open AccessArticle

Effect of Mobile Health on Modifying the Behaviouraland Physiological Risk Factors of Non-communicable Diseases in Adult HIV Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy in Fako Division

Tah Aldof Yoah1, , Nde Fon Peter1, Tendongfor Nicholas1, Enow Orock George2, Anna Longdoh Njunda3, Njukang Ernest Nkem4 and Kah Emmanuel Nji4

1Department of Public Health and Hygiene, Faculty of Health sciences,University of Buea, Cameroon

2Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health sciences, University of Buea, Cameroon

3Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Health sciences, University of Buea, Cameroon

4Department of Public Health and Hygiene, University of Buea, Cameroon

Pub. Date: May 30, 2023

Cite this paper:
Tah Aldof Yoah, Nde Fon Peter, Tendongfor Nicholas, Enow Orock George, Anna Longdoh Njunda, Njukang Ernest Nkem and Kah Emmanuel Nji. Effect of Mobile Health on Modifying the Behaviouraland Physiological Risk Factors of Non-communicable Diseases in Adult HIV Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy in Fako Division. American Journal of Epidemiology and Infectious Disease. 2023; 11(1):1-10. doi: 10.12691/ajeid-11-1-1

Abstract

Background: Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have reached epidemic proportion among people living with HIV (PLHIV) and this could have a negative bearing on the quality of life and survival of these patients. The incorporation of a target specially dedicated to NCDs within the goal number 3 of the newly adopted Sustainable Development Goals indicates the importance the world now accords to the prevention and control of these diseases. Mobile phone technology is increasingly viewed as a promising communication channel that can be utilized for primary prevention of NCDs by promoting behavioural changes and risk factor modification. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of mobile Health on modifying the behavioural and physiological risk factors of non-communicable diseases in adult HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy in Fako Division, South West Region of Cameroon. Methodology: A non-ramdomised hospital-based control trial was conducted on 275 subjects, over a period of one year. A mHealth intervention package consisting of weekly text messages and monthly telephone calls addressing lifestyle modification for risk factors of NCDs was given to the intervention group, compared to no intervention package in control group. Data was entered in SPSS 25 and analyzed using stata 13. Chi-square test, ANOVA and paired sample t-test were used for the analysis. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Results: The mHealth intervention significantly increased the mean number of fruits/vegetable servings a day (2.5 to 4.2, p<0.001), mean physical activity level in MET-min/wk (243.3 to 301.1, p<0.001) and the physical domain of quality of life (68.3 to 70.9, p=0.021) in the intervention group but not in the control group. This intervention equally significantly decreased the mean BMI (26.4 to 25.7, p=0.004) and the SBP (125.4 to 124.0, p=0.003) in the intervention but not in the control group. Conclusion: Our study has demonstrated the usefulness of mHealth for health promotion and lifestyle modification among adult HIV patients on ART. With the growing burden of NCDs among PLHIV, such cost effective and innovative measures will be needed that can easily reach the masses.

Keywords:
effect mHealth behavioural and physiological risk factors Quality of Life HIV ART Fako Division

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

References:

[1]  Fezeu L, Balkau B, Kengne AP, Sobngwi E, Mbanya JC: Metabolic syndrome in a sub-Saharan African setting: central obesity may be the key determinant. Atherosclerosis 2007, 193: 70-76.
 
[2]  Dimala CA, Atashili J, Mbuagbaw JC, Wilfred A, Monekosso GL: Prevalence of Hypertension in HIV/AIDS Patients on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) Compared with HAARTNaïve Patients at the Limbe Regional Hospital, Cameroon. PLOS ONE 2016, 11(2): 1-11.
 
[3]  Nsagha DS, Weledji EP, Assob NJ, Njunda LA, Tanue EA, kibu OD, Ayima CW, Ngowe MN: Highly active antiretroviral therapy and dyslipidemia in people living with HIV/AIDS in Fako Division, South West Region of Cameroon. BMC Cardiovascular Disorders 2016, 15(95).
 
[4]  Bloomfield GS, Alenezi F, Barasa FA, Lumsden R, Mayosi BM, Velazquez EJ: Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Heart Failure in Low- and Middle-Income Countries. Elsevier 2015, 3: 579-590.
 
[5]  Di Cesare M, Khang YH, Asaria P, Blakely T, Cowan MJ, Farzadfar F, Guerrero R, Ikeda N, Kyobutungi C, Msyamboza KP et al: Inequalities in non-communicable diseases and effective response. The Lancet 2013, 381(9866): 585-597.
 
[6]  Kontis V, Mathers CD, Rehm J, Stevens GA, Shield KD, Bonita R, Riley LM, Poznyak V, Beaglehole R, Ezzati M: Contribution of six risk factors to achieving the 25× 25 non-communicable disease mortality reduction target: a modelling study. . The Lancet 2014, 384: 427-437.
 
[7]  WHO: Impact of COVID-19 on NCDs. World Health Organization 2020.
 
[8]  DHS-MICS: Demographic and Health Survey and Multiple Indicators Cluster Survey DHS-MICS 2011. In. Yaounde: National Institute of Statistics; 2012.
 
[9]  World Health Organization-Noncommunicable diseases (NCD) country report, 2014. In. Geneva: WHO; 2015.
 
[10]  Vandelanotte C, Müller AM, Short CE: Past, present and future or e- & mHealth research to improve physical activity and dietary behaviors. J Nutr Educ Behav 2016, 48: 219-228.
 
[11]  RTG-SW: Annual Report. Regional Technical Group for the South West Region, Cameroon 2020.
 
[12]  Charan J, Biswa T: How to Calculate Sample Size for Different Study Designs in Medical Research? Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine. 2013, 35(2): 121-126.
 
[13]  Chhoun P, Ngin C, Tuot S, Pal S, Steel M, Dionisio J, Pearson H, Mburu G, Brody C, Yi S: Non-communicable diseases and related risk behaviors among men and women living with HIV in Cambodia: findings from a cross-sectional study. International Journal for Equity in Health 2017, 16(125).
 
[14]  Organization WH: The WHO STEPwise approach to surveillance of non-communicable diseases (STEPS). In. Geneva: WHO; 2003.
 
[15]  WHO: The WHO STEPwise approach to noncommunicable disease risk factor surveillance. In. Geneva: World Health Organisation; 2017.
 
[16]  WHO: WHOQOL Group, Program on Mental Health, World Health Organization. World Health Organization 2015.
 
[17]  Sharma M, Banerjee B, Ingle GK, Garg S: Effect of mHealth on modifying behavioural risk-factors of noncommunicable diseases in an adult, rural population in Delhi, India. mHealth 2017, 3(42): 1-9.
 
[18]  Vandelanotte C, Müller AM, Short CE: Past, present and future or e- & mHealth research to improve physical activity and dietary behaviors. J Nutr Educ Behav 2016, 48: 219-228.
 
[19]  Haapala I, Barengo NC, Biggs S: Weight loss by mobile phone: a 1-year effectiveness study. Public Health Nutr 2009, 12:2382-2391.
 
[20]  Müller AM, Alley S, Schoeppe S: The effectiveness of e-& mHealth interventions to promote physical activity and healthy diets in developing countries: A systematic review. . Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 2016, 13: 109.