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Zhao, L. The gut microbiota and obesity: from correlation to causality. Nature Reviews Microbiology, 11, 639-47. 2013.

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Article

Effect of the Synbiotic (B. animalis spp. lactis Bb12 + Oligofructose) in Obese Subjects. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Clinical Trial

1Laboratory of Microbiology and Probiotics, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, El Libano 5524, Macul, Santiago, Chile

2Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Independencia 1027, Independencia, Santiago, Chile

3Laboratory of Energy Metabolism, INTA, University of Chile, El Libano 5524, Macul, Santiago, Chile


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2014, Vol. 2 No. 8, 491-498
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-2-8-10
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Francisca Peña, Maria Luisa Mizgier, Pamela Morales, Israel Rios, Catalina Carrasco-Pozo, Erik Diaz, Oscar Brunser, Martin Gotteland. Effect of the Synbiotic (B. animalis spp. lactis Bb12 + Oligofructose) in Obese Subjects. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Clinical Trial. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2014; 2(8):491-498. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-2-8-10.

Abstract

Rats fed high fat diets have alterations of their intestinal microbiota, gut barrier function, circulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels and biomarkers of oxidative stress, inflammation, and glucose/insulin metabolism, resulting in a higher risk of type-2 diabetes. These deleterious effects are prevented by antibiotics or prebiotics. The aim of this study was to determine whether the administration of a synbiotic improves metabolic alterations and low grade inflammation in obese subjects. A randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial (www.ClinicalTrials.gov, Access Number NCT01235026) was carried out in 40 obese patients. Subjects were distributed in two groups to receive 8g oligofructose + 1 g of lyophilized Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (1010 CFU/g) or 9g maltodextrin as placebo, twice a day for six weeks. Body composition, blood lipids, antioxidant capacity of plasma, biomarkers of inflammation (usCRP, IL-6) and LPS exposure (LPS-Binding Protein, LBP, and sCD14), areas under curves of glycemia and insulinemia and fecal microbiota (qPCR) were quantified at baseline and after treatment. 38 subjects (34.8 ± 9.2y; BMI: 36.7 ± 5.3 kg.m-2) completed the study. A positive correlation was observed at baseline between usCRP, IL-6, LBP, sCD14 and the percentage of body fat; correlations also existed between usCRP, IL-6 and LBP values while sCD14 only correlated with IL-6. Compared with placebo, the administration of synbiotic increased the fecal levels of Bifidobacterium spp. but did not affect body composition, lipid profile, antioxidant status and areas under curves of glycemia and insulinemia, nor the plasma concentrations of usCRP, IL-6 and LBP. Plasma concentrations of sCD14 were significantly lower after treatment in the symbiotic group compared with the placebo 3 group (5.98 μg/ml [5.01-6.96] vs. 7.26 [6.34-8.09] μg/ml (Means [CI95%), respectively; p=0.043). The synbiotic increased fecal bifidobacteria in obese subjects without improvement the biochemical, inflammatory and metabolic markers; more studies are required to elucidate the role of the symbiotic on plasma sCD14.

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