Article citationsMore >>

Bandura, A. (1982). Self-efficacy mechanism in human agency. American Psychologist, 37, 122-147.

has been cited by the following article:

Article

Comparative Study on Pre-Service Science Teachers’ Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Teaching in Kenya and the United States of America; USA

1Department of Science and Mathematics Education, Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology (MMUST), Kakamega, Kenya

2Ball State University, Department of Biology, University Way, Muncie, IN, USA


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, Vol. 2 No. 4, 233-239
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-4-9
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Catherine M. Aurah, Tom J. McConnell. Comparative Study on Pre-Service Science Teachers’ Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Teaching in Kenya and the United States of America; USA. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(4):233-239. doi: 10.12691/education-2-4-9.

Correspondence to: Catherine  M. Aurah, Department of Science and Mathematics Education, Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology (MMUST), Kakamega, Kenya. Email: cataurah@yahoo.com

Abstract

This study examined and compared science teacher efficacy beliefs of elementary pre-service teachers in Kenya and U.S.A. by surveying 168 Kenyan and 189 US Pre-service teachers through a cross-sectional survey research design. Data were collected using STEBI-B scale, an inventory developed by by Enochs and Riggs (1990), with a reported Cronbach’s Alpha coefficients as 0.90 and 0.76 for Personal Science Teacher Efficacy (PSTE) and Science Teacher Outcome Expectancy (STOE), respectively. Data were analysed both descriptively (means and standard deviations) and inferentially using a 2 x 2 factorial MANOVA. The dependent variables were PSTE and STOE scores. The independent variables were participant gender and country of origin. Results indicate a significant interaction between gender and country. There was a significant main effect for country but not for gender. With a significant MANOVA, follow-up univariate ANOVA tests indicated a statistically significant difference in the PSTE with USA scoring higher on average and a significant difference in the STOE score with Kenya scoring higher. Implications for teacher education programs are discussed.

Keywords