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Holick, M.F. “Vitamin D deficiency”, N Engl J Med., 357. 266-81. July 2007.

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Article

Relationship between Anthropometric Measurements and Serum Vitamin D Levels in a Convenient Sample of Healthy Adults

1Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Pharmacy & Medical Sciences, University of Petra, Amman, Jordan

2Orthopedic Surgery Consultant/ Medical Doctor-Private Clinic, Amman, Jordan

3Department of Nutrition and Food Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2020, Vol. 8 No. 4, 195-200
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-8-4-6
Copyright © 2020 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Seham Abu Jadayil, Bassam Abu Jadayel, Hamed Takruri, Marwan Muwalla, Hiba Al-Sayyed. Relationship between Anthropometric Measurements and Serum Vitamin D Levels in a Convenient Sample of Healthy Adults. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2020; 8(4):195-200. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-8-4-6.

Correspondence to: Seham  Abu Jadayil, Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Pharmacy & Medical Sciences, University of Petra, Amman, Jordan. Email: sabujadayil@uop.edu.jo

Abstract

The deficiency of vitamin D has been linked to many factors such as; age, female gender, and obesity. An inverse relationship between serum vitamin D and the percentage of fat, body weight, and body mass index (BMI) has been found. So, this study aimed to examine the relationship between anthropometric measurements such as body weight, BMI, percentage of body fat, and physical activity and serum vitamin D levels in a convenient sample of healthy adults in Jordan. Serum vitamin D level was assessed in a convenient sample of 52 healthy Jordanian volunteers aged between 18 to 45 years were recruited. A questionnaire about their socio-demographic information was filled, anthropometric measurements were carried out. According to Pearson’s correlation analysis, only percentage of body fat (inverse relationship; r = -0.296, p =0.039) and height (positive relationship; r = 0.514, p = 0.000) were significantly associated with serum vitamin D levels in all participants (p ˂ 0.05). Weekly physical activity hours and educational levels were positively and significantly associated with serum vitamin D levels in females only. Age and other anthropometric measurements had no significant relationships with the serum level of vitamin D in all participants or either in males or females. There was a significant relationship between occupational level and serum vitamin D levels (p = 0.043). In conclusion, there was no significant correlation between anthropometric measurements and serum vitamin D levels except for a significant inverse relationship with the percentage of body fat. Additionally, serum vitamin D level was marginal in females and sufficient in males enrolled in this study.

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