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Article

Anti-Inflammatory Effect of o-Vanillic Acid on Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Macrophages and Inflammation Models

1Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Republic of Korea

2Immunoregulatory Materials Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Jeongeup, Republic of Korea

3College of Pharmacy, Woosuk University, Jeonju, Republic of Korea

4Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Gachon University, Incheon, Republic of Korea


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2018, Vol. 6 No. 4, 227-233
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-6-4-4
Copyright © 2018 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Jun-Kyoung Lee, Soyoung Lee, Tae-Yong Shin, Dongwoo Khang, Sang-Hyun Kim. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of o-Vanillic Acid on Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Macrophages and Inflammation Models. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2018; 6(4):227-233. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-6-4-4.

Correspondence to: Sang-Hyun  Kim, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Republic of Korea. Email: dkhang@gachon.ac.kr, shkim72@knu.ac.kr

Abstract

Inflammation is an important biological reaction in the body in response to external stimuli. Excessive inflammation causes various inflammatory disorders such as allergic hypersensitivity, autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer. Macrophages play a major role in the inflammatory response by producing inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2, and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Natural products are often a source of bioactive compounds, which have great potential as novel therapeutic agents. Amomum xanthoides extract has been shown to possess various pharmacological activities including anti-inflammatory activity. This study evaluated the anti-inflammatory potential of o-vanillic acid (o-VA), a major compound in A. xanthoides, using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophages and in vivo animal models. o-VA decreased, in a concentration-dependent manner, the LPS-induced gene expression and production of inflammatory mediators, such as inducible nitric oxidase/cyclooxygenase-2 and pro-inflammatory cytokines, by reducing the nuclear factor-κB activation. In addition, o-VA dose-dependently ameliorated acetic acid-induced vascular permeability and zymosan-induced leukocyte migration. Thus, we suggest that o-VA can be used as a pharmacological agent or food supplement in the treatment of inflammatory conditions.

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