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Pal R.N. and Mahadevan, V. (1968). Chemical Composition and Nutritive Value of Bijada cake (Citrullus vulgaris). Indian Veterinary Journal. 45: 433-439.

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Article

Nutritional Comparison of Processed and Unprocessed Citrillus lanatus (Watermelon) Seeds for Possible Use in Feed Formulation

1Department of Biochemistry, University of Maiduguri, Borno, Nigeria

2Department of Biochemistry, Bauchi State University, Gadau-Azare, Nigeria


American Journal of Food and Nutrition. 2018, Vol. 6 No. 2, 33-36
DOI: 10.12691/ajfn-6-2-1
Copyright © 2018 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
M.A. Milala, A. Luther, B. Burah. Nutritional Comparison of Processed and Unprocessed Citrillus lanatus (Watermelon) Seeds for Possible Use in Feed Formulation. American Journal of Food and Nutrition. 2018; 6(2):33-36. doi: 10.12691/ajfn-6-2-1.

Correspondence to: B.  Burah, Department of Biochemistry, University of Maiduguri, Borno, Nigeria. Email: bulama19@gmail.com

Abstract

Citrullus lanatus (watermelon) seeds are often discarded, while its fruits are eaten. In this study, effects of processing either by roasting or drying of the seeds was assayed by analyzing proximate, mineral and vitamin A contents for possible boasting of animal feeds. The proximate analysis and vitamin A determination were performed using standard methods. Mineral elements content was determined by Atomic Absorptions Spectrophotometry (AAS). The results of the proximate composition of processed and unprocessed watermelon seeds had moisture content of 6.29% and 5.06%, ash content 2.59% and 2.98%, crude fat 47% and 32.9%, crude protein 68.04% and 49.7%, crude fibre 1.13% and 2.10% and carbohydrate 24.99% and 6.06% respectively. The elemental composition of both processed and unprocessed seeds showed that magnesium and sulphur contents were higher in unprocessed than processed seeds, while potassium, calcium, phosphorus, iron, copper, zinc and manganese contents of both processed and unprocessed seed were statistically similar. The crude fats, proteins and carbohydrates contents of the processed seeds were significantly higher (p<0.001) compared with the unprocessed seeds. The vitamin A content of both processed and unprocessed seeds were found to be 0.033 µg/g and 0.056 µg/g respectively. However, vitamin A content of the unprocessed seeds was higher when compared with the processed seed. Therefore, the result of this study recommends that both processed and unprocessed Citrullus lanatus seeds may serve as suitable candidates in feed formulation.

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