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Adebowale, A. R. A., Emmambux, M. N., Beukes, M., Taylor, J. R. “Fractionation and characterization of teff proteins,” J Cereal Sci, 54(3). 380-386. 2011.

has been cited by the following article:

Article

Teff: Suitability for Different Food Applications and as a Raw Material of Gluten-free, a Literature Review

1Department of Food Technology, Institute of Technology, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, Seropédica, RJ, Brazil

2Post-Graduation in Phytotherapy, Supplementation and Functional Foods in Clinical Practice, UniFOA, Tangerinal, Volta Redonda – RJ –Brazil

3Foreign Trade, Universidade Estácio de Sá, Resende – RJ –Brazil


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2018, Vol. 6 No. 2, 74-81
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-6-2-2
Copyright © 2018 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Kamila de Oliveira do Nascimento, Sany do Nascimento Dias Paes, Indianara Reis de Oliveira, Isabela Pereira Reis, Ivanilda Maria Augusta. Teff: Suitability for Different Food Applications and as a Raw Material of Gluten-free, a Literature Review. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2018; 6(2):74-81. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-6-2-2.

Correspondence to: Kamila  de Oliveira do Nascimento, Department of Food Technology, Institute of Technology, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, Seropédica, RJ, Brazil. Email: kamila.nascimento@yahoo.com.br

Abstract

Teff has naturally higher nutritional value when compared to many other grains, and doesn’t need to be fortified. Naturally gluten-free, the grain of teff can substitute for wheat flour and other cereals in anything from bread and pasta to waffles and pizza bases, as well as foods for people with celiac disease. Thus, the main objective of this article is to review researches on teff, evaluate its suitability for different food applications, and give direction for further research on its applications for gluten free food market. Teff grain size is known to be extremely small with mean length ranging 0.61-1.17mm and it is considered a superior grain due to its nutritional merits. Teff is rich in carbohydrate, fiber and contains more iron, calcium and zinc than other cereal grains, including wheat, barley and sorghum. Teff has an excellent balance of essential amino acids and is a good source of calcium and iron, which may explain the low occurrence of anemia in areas of Ethiopia where to regular teff consumption. Hence, Teff is an ideal and healthy ingredient for many gluten-free recipes.

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