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Michalke, B., “Trace element speciation in human milk”, Pure and Applied Chemistry, 78, 79-90, 2006.

has been cited by the following article:

Article

Changes on Levels of Essential Trace Elements in Selenium Naturally Enriched Milk

1Department of Nutrition, Grasslands and Forages, Regional Institute for Research and Agro-Food Development, SERIDA, Villaviciosa, Spain

2Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2016, Vol. 4 No. 5, 303-308
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-4-5-6
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Amelia González-Arrojo, Ana Soldado, Fernando Vicente, Ma Luisa Fernández Sánchez, Alfredo Sanz-Medel, Begoña de la Roza-Delgado. Changes on Levels of Essential Trace Elements in Selenium Naturally Enriched Milk. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2016; 4(5):303-308. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-4-5-6.

Correspondence to: Begoña  de la Roza-Delgado, Department of Nutrition, Grasslands and Forages, Regional Institute for Research and Agro-Food Development, SERIDA, Villaviciosa, Spain. Email: broza@serida.org

Abstract

Selenium (Se) enrichment improves milk functional nutrient content enhancing its nutritive value and providing health benefits. This Se enriched milk can be considered as “nutraceutical” or “functional food”. However, this benefit should not affect negatively other milk properties, such as its trace element contents. Holstein-Friesian cows diets were supplemented with increasing Se dosages in order to obtain on-farm Se enriched milk, and trace metals content including Co, Cu, I, Se and Zn were determined in these milk samples. Our results showed that Se milk supplementation did not affect negatively other trace element levels in milk, obtaining a functional food designed to allow consumers to drink enriched milk close to their natural state. No effect was detected on Co, I and Zn at any Se supplementation dosages. However, Cu level decreased when Se concentration in milk was higher than 100 ng/g.

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