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Peijnenburg, W. J. G. M. and Vijver, M. G. (2007). Metal-specific interactions at the interface of chemistry and biology. Pure and Applied Chemistry, 79: 2351-2366.

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Elemental Composition of the Fruits of Baboon Grape (Rhoicissus digitata) and Impact of Soil Quality on Chemical Characteristics

1School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2016, Vol. 4 No. 1, 6-11
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-4-1-2
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Lungisa Mlambo, Neil Koorbanally, Roshila Moodley. Elemental Composition of the Fruits of Baboon Grape (Rhoicissus digitata) and Impact of Soil Quality on Chemical Characteristics. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2016; 4(1):6-11. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-4-1-2.

Correspondence to: Roshila  Moodley, School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa. Email: moodleyrosh@ukzn.ac.za

Abstract

Rhoicissus digitata is an indigenous medicinal plant from which fruits are consumed by the local people in South Africa. This potential source of nutrients was investigated as a food-based approach to complement fortification efforts in South Africa targeted at vulnerable groups. This study also focused on the distribution of elements (essential and toxic) in the fruits of R. digitata as a function of soil quality. In general, the concentration of essential elements in the fruits were found to be in decreasing order of Ca > Mg > Fe > Mn > Zn > Cu > Se > Ni > Cr > Pb > Co. The data showed that the plant controlled uptake of nutrients to meet physiological requirement levels. A comparison of the fruits elemental concentrations with recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) revealed the fruits to be rich in Se and are a good source of essential elements with low concentrations of the toxic elements studied. These findings indicate that the fruits of R. digitata have high nutritional value and can introduce dietary diversity and food security to marginalized and poor communities in South Africa.

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