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Article

Food Choice Behaviour among Ghanaians: Implications for Health Promotion

1Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Biomedical and Allied Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana

2Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana


World Journal of Nutrition and Health. 2015, Vol. 3 No. 1, 22-28
DOI: 10.12691/jnh-3-1-4
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Frank Hayford, Matilda Steiner-Asiedu, Esther Sakyi-Dawson. Food Choice Behaviour among Ghanaians: Implications for Health Promotion. World Journal of Nutrition and Health. 2015; 3(1):22-28. doi: 10.12691/jnh-3-1-4.

Correspondence to: Frank  Hayford, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Biomedical and Allied Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana. Email: actuallyman@yahoo.com

Abstract

Even though the key drive for eating is hunger, what one chooses to eat is not determined solely by physiological or nutritional needs. Consumers make their purchasing decisions based on a number of factors, hence the need for greater understanding of these determinants to facilitate outcome of successful interventions. The study was to investigate the determinants of food choice behaviour among Ghanaians in the Greater Accra Region. A cross-sectional survey, mainly by questionnaire, was used to source information on socio-demographic, medical history and food choice behaviours of consumers between the ages of 18-75 years who patronize some super markets and shopping malls within the Greater Accra Region. Multivariate logistic regression model was used to examine and assess associations between determinants of food choice behaviour and socio-demographic predictors. All analyses were two-tailed and a 'p' value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Money (cost), time (convenience), adverts and label information were some key determinants that influenced food choice behaviour of most respondents. Females were mostly influenced by nutrition/diet books and food label information as compared to male respondents. Our findings also suggested that respondents with education up to middle school or no formal education were more likely to be influenced by advertisement on mass media compared to those with formal education from the senior high school up to the university levels. Perceived body weight did not influence food choice behaviour much since most participants thought they had normal weight. Socio-economic status, level of education and gender are key determinants of food choice behaviours. These are key factors to be considered to plan interventions to help Ghanaians make better food choices.

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