Article citationsMore >>

Wells, L. J. (1995). The group-as-a-whole: A systemic socioanalytic perspective on interpersonal and group relations. In J. Gillette & M. McCollom (Eds.), Groups in context: A new perspective on group dynamics (pp. 50-85). Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.

has been cited by the following article:

Article

Frustration Factor in Group Collaborative Learning Experiences

1School of Education, Department of Educational Administration, Curriculum and Teaching, University of Eastern Africa, Baraton, P.O. Box 2500 Eldoret 30100, Kenya


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, Vol. 2 No. 11A, 16-22
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-11A-3
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Lazarus Ndiku Makewa, Dorcas Gitonga, Baraka Ngussa, Samwel Njoroge, Joshua Kuboja. Frustration Factor in Group Collaborative Learning Experiences. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(11A):16-22. doi: 10.12691/education-2-11A-3.

Correspondence to: Lazarus  Ndiku Makewa, School of Education, Department of Educational Administration, Curriculum and Teaching, University of Eastern Africa, Baraton, P.O. Box 2500 Eldoret 30100, Kenya. Email: ndikul@gmail.com

Abstract

This study was carried out in the University of Eastern Africa, Baraton, Kenya. It sought to find out students’ frustration level after group learning experiences, how often they went through these experiences, how frustration affected their Bachelor of Education Program, how BED with its group collaborative learning methodology met their expectations, if they were getting quality training and finally if they would take part in the future in another course requiring group collaborative learning. A larger percentage of students stated that they were frustrated as they went through collaborative learning. However, they did not feel that frustration as factor has any effect on their Bachelor of Education program. Collaborative learning as a set of instructional strategies, when used properly, can help learners to meet specific learning and social interaction objectives in structured groups. It can also promote social interaction to facilitate knowledge construction. Further, if students are well prepared to work in small groups and if the groups are well organized, students’ collaboration can increase students’ achievement more than traditional methods of learning. It is therefore recommended that in the course of the lesson, teachers set time for group work to motivate the learners, not only interacting with the content, but also with the group members.

Keywords