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Koro-Ljungberg, M. & Hayes, S. (2010) Proposing an argument for research questions that could create permeable boundaries within qualitative research Journal of Ethnographic & Qualitative Research [Online] 4, 3, p. 114-124.

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Article

The Creative Analytic Paradigm and Generative Social Research within the Context of the Early-Years/Kindergarten Physical Learning Environment

1Institute of Education, University of Worcester, Worcester, England


American Journal of Educational Research. 2014, Vol. 2 No. 5, 283-290
DOI: 10.12691/education-2-5-8
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Anthony Barnett. The Creative Analytic Paradigm and Generative Social Research within the Context of the Early-Years/Kindergarten Physical Learning Environment. American Journal of Educational Research. 2014; 2(5):283-290. doi: 10.12691/education-2-5-8.

Correspondence to: Anthony  Barnett, Institute of Education, University of Worcester, Worcester, England. Email: a.barnett@worc.ac.uk

Abstract

Innovative approaches to research methodology are a potential counterbalance to the dominance of established methods and may be more responsive to specific research aims. However, approaching research differently incurs risks associated with evaluation of quality of methods and outcomes. This article starts the process of engaging with key methodological issues to provide a foundation for developing an innovative approach. The starting point is a focus on categorisation theory related to qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods. The article focuses on superordinate, basic and subordinate categories when responding to the stretching boundaries of qualitative research. Attention is then given to the concept of research paradigm; role of research questions; approaches to data collection and analysis; and to assessing quality as some of the starting points for developing an innovative approach. The creative analytic paradigm as a basic category and generative social research as a superordinate category are introduced and exemplified with reference to the early-years/kindergarten learning environment. The article then illustrates a subordinate category research design that involves the burgeoning of experience though time in response to evocative objects from the early-years learning environment. The resulting methodology is a straightforward and manageable form of meaning based reflective practice.

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