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Suryawati, E. and Osman, K. Contextual Learning: Innovative Approach towards the Development of Students’ Scientific Attitude and Natural Science Performance. EURASIA Journal of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education. 14(1): 61-76 2018.

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Article

Critical Reflection in Science Teaching and Learning: Crossing Borders into Western Science

1Institutional Research and Quality Management, National University of Science and Technology, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe

2Department of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education, National University of Science and Technology, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe


American Journal of Educational Research. 2021, Vol. 9 No. 5, 313-319
DOI: 10.12691/education-9-5-9
Copyright © 2021 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Nduduzo Phuthi, Irene Mpofu. Critical Reflection in Science Teaching and Learning: Crossing Borders into Western Science. American Journal of Educational Research. 2021; 9(5):313-319. doi: 10.12691/education-9-5-9.

Correspondence to: Nduduzo  Phuthi, Institutional Research and Quality Management, National University of Science and Technology, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. Email: nduduzo.phuthi@nust.ac.zw

Abstract

Critical reflection enables humans to come to an awareness of how ideologies shape beliefs and practices that justify and maintain global economic and political inequity, explaining how subjugated people get convinced to embrace dominant ideologies as always being in their own best interests. Cultural change and adjustment is imminent in Africa as the waves of globalization sweep through, and science teachers need to develop correct frames of thinking to make sense of science teaching and learning. Serving and prospective teachers need to construct methods and purposes which reflect their own lived experiences and rationales for professionalism. This paper reports on a research study that sought to demystify western science through critical reflection, encouraging developing country cultures to use the science as their own tool for cultural progressiveness. It discusses the value of engagement by science educators and learners from non-western backgrounds in serious intellectual dialogues concerning their classroom practice on one hand, and their own feelings and thoughts about this practice gained from previous learnings and experiences, on the other. The paper draws from a qualitative case study carried out in a high school biology class in Zimbabwe. Insights from this study underscore the gains to science teachers and learners who engage themselves in self-initiated personal and methodological reflection on their pedagogical encounters. The microcosm of learnings from such reflection should promote transferrable learning to address short and long term life goals including personal welfare, ambition, heritage, and destinies of future generations.

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