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Article

Capsinoids Supplementation does not Prevent Weight Gain and does not Change Lipid Profile in Wistar Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet

1LANNEM – Laboratory of Nutrition, Neuroscience and Metabolism, Department of Medicine – Division of Nutrology, Ribeirão Preto Medical School. University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

2Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Ribeirão Preto Medical School. University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

3Department of Medicine – Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Ribeirão Preto Medical School – University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2019, Vol. 7 No. 8, 619-623
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-7-8-10
Copyright © 2019 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Ana Carolina Campi Cansian, Caroline Bertoncini-Silva, Anderson Gregorio Joaquim, Cassia Dias Machado, Daniela Carlos, Aline Jose Coelho Moreira Zordan, Maria Cristina Foss Freitas, Vivian Marques Miguel Suen. Capsinoids Supplementation does not Prevent Weight Gain and does not Change Lipid Profile in Wistar Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2019; 7(8):619-623. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-7-8-10.

Correspondence to: Caroline  Bertoncini-Silva, LANNEM – Laboratory of Nutrition, Neuroscience and Metabolism, Department of Medicine – Division of Nutrology, Ribeirão Preto Medical School. University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. Email: bertoncinicaroline@gmail.com

Abstract

We hypothesized that capsinoids supplementation, a bioactive vanillylamines isolated from chili peppers, would exert protective effects against high-fat diet -induced weight gain via regulation of lipid, glucose and insulin profile. To test our hypothesis, twenty-four male Wistar rats were fed a standard diet, standard diet with capsinoids, high-fat diet and high-fat diet with capsinoids for 6 weeks. Capsinoids dose was 0.18 mg/kg/d. During the experiment, body weight and food intake were evaluated weekly and biochemical analyses were performed at the end of the experimental period. Only high-fat diet with capsinoids presented lower total food intake as compared to standard diet with capsinoids group (~35%). Nevertheless, there were no significant differences in weight gain between the groups. Capsinoids supplementation did not prevent retroperitoneal and epididymal fat gain on high-fat diet with capsinoids, as well did not change brown fat and liver weight. Moreover, no statistical difference was observed for high-fat diet or capsinoids supplementation on blood glucose, insulin and lipid profile. In conclusion, these results suggest that capsinoids supplementation in obesity experimental model of Wistar rats, has limited effects to prevent weight and fat gain, as well as do not regulate metabolic profile.

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