Article citationsMore >>

Anderson J. W. (2007). Whole grains protect against atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society; 62(1): 135-142.

has been cited by the following article:

Article

Comparative Evaluation of the Cooking Time, Nutritional and Sensory Properties of Meals Prepared with Whole, Semi-polished and Polished Rice Grains

1Institute of Agricultural Research and Training, Obafemi Awolowo University, Apata, Ibadan

2Federal College of Agriculture, Moor Plantation, Apata, Ibadan


World Journal of Agricultural Research. 2019, Vol. 7 No. 1, 1-7
DOI: 10.12691/wjar-7-1-1
Copyright © 2019 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Adeniyi Paulina O., Obatolu Veronica A., Fowosire Owotade A., Lawal Oladayo S.. Comparative Evaluation of the Cooking Time, Nutritional and Sensory Properties of Meals Prepared with Whole, Semi-polished and Polished Rice Grains. World Journal of Agricultural Research. 2019; 7(1):1-7. doi: 10.12691/wjar-7-1-1.

Correspondence to: Adeniyi Paulina O., Institute of Agricultural Research and Training, Obafemi Awolowo University, Apata, Ibadan. Email: doyinadeniyi@yahoo.com

Abstract

Encouraging the consumption of whole grains may be a feasible and easy measure to combat non-communicable diseases which are the major causes of death globally. This experimental study was therefore designed to compare the cooking time, nutritional and sensory properties of meals prepared with whole, semi-polished and polished rice grains with the view of encouraging the consumption of whole rice gains in place of the refined ones. White rice, curried rice and jollof rice were prepared with whole, semi-polished and polished rice grains using basic ingredients of standard recipes. Cooking time, nutritional and sensory evaluation were determined using appropriate standard procedures. Mean data were compared using Analysis of Variance at p≤0.05. For whole rice cooking time (minutes) for white, curried and jollof rice was: 30.33, 29.33 and 25.33; for semi-polished rice these was: 31.33, 32.00 and 38.00 while for polished rice it was: 32.33, 36.00 and 30.33 respectively. The proximate composition (% in DWB) of white rice prepared with whole, semi-polished and polished rice grains were as follows: Protein (9.80, 9.37, 8.70); Fat (4.19, 2.22, 0.78); Ash (3.20, 2.22, 2.01); Crude fibre (4.80, 1.95, 1.56) and Carbohydrate (78.01, 84.24, 86.95). White rice prepared with whole rice and semi-polished rice was significantly higher (p≤0.05) than polished rice in niacin and riboflavin but surprisingly, the meal from polished rice was highest in thiamine content. White rice, curried rice and jollof rice prepared with whole rice grains were comparable in flavour, texture, taste aroma and overall acceptability with those prepared with semi-polished and polished rice, however, there is need to improve on the colour and appearance as well as construction of rice milling machine that can dehusk only. The cooking time and sensory properties of whole rice dishes were comparable with that of the refined ones while the nutritive value was notably higher. Household and commercial preparation and consumption of whole rice dishes is hereby encouraged but the major militating factor, which is the unavailability of milling machine that can only dehusk, is a factor of utmost necessary concern.

Keywords