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Clifton, D. O., & Harter, J. K. (2003). “Strengths investment.” In K. S. Cameron, J. E. Dutton, & R. E. Quinn (Eds.), Positive organizational scholarship. (pp. 111-121). San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler, 2003.

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Article

Establishing StrengthsFinder Norms for Veterinary Medical Students

1Department of Clinical Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA

2Office of Academic Affairs, North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC, USA

3Education Support Services, North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC, USA


American Journal of Educational Research. 2018, Vol. 6 No. 2, 152-157
DOI: 10.12691/education-6-2-11
Copyright © 2018 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Kenneth D. Royal, Betsy Taylor, Rivers Baker, Jeffrey Huckel, Keven Flammer. Establishing StrengthsFinder Norms for Veterinary Medical Students. American Journal of Educational Research. 2018; 6(2):152-157. doi: 10.12691/education-6-2-11.

Correspondence to: Kenneth  D. Royal, Department of Clinical Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA. Email: kdroyal2@ncsu.edu

Abstract

The Clifton StrengthsFinder 2.0 is an online assessment administered by the Gallup organization. The assessment is intended to help individuals identify their greatest talents, and once identified, use that information to further develop one’s predominant strengths. Colleges and universities routinely administer the StrengthsFinder to students, but to date there is sparse literature presenting any results. Interestingly, academic disciplinary differences has been identified as the single most differentiating factor regarding members of an academic community. This is due to the strong influence of disciplinary norms, cultures and values that both attract individuals to a community and sustain members once a part of the community. Thus, the use of a standardized assessment with well-evidenced psychometric properties could be particularly useful for making comparisons about students’ attributes across these communities. This study sought to create a new line of research inquiry by exploring StrengthsFinder results and establishing an initial set of norms for students in the field of veterinary medicine. Substantive results found veterinary students’ most predominant strengths were Achiever and Learner, followed by Restorative, Input, Relator, Harmony and Responsibility. The five least common Signature Themes were Self-Assurance, Connectedness, Activator, Command, and Maximizer. Results from this study may be used to compare and contrast students’ predominant strengths and talents in other programs, particularly those in the medical and health professions.

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