Article citationsMore >>

Healthy People 2020. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2010. http://www.healthypeople.gov. Accessed October 12, 2016.

has been cited by the following article:

Article

Relationships among Diet Quality, BMI, Cooking Skills and Frequency of Food Preparation: A Pilot Study

1Department of Health, Nutrition & Exercise Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, USA


American Journal of Educational Research. 2017, Vol. 5 No. 1, 36-42
DOI: 10.12691/education-5-1-6
Copyright © 2017 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Jenna Kourajian, Sherri Stastny, Ardith Brunt. Relationships among Diet Quality, BMI, Cooking Skills and Frequency of Food Preparation: A Pilot Study. American Journal of Educational Research. 2017; 5(1):36-42. doi: 10.12691/education-5-1-6.

Correspondence to: Sherri  Stastny, Department of Health, Nutrition & Exercise Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, USA. Email: sherri.stastny@ndsu.edu

Abstract

Background: Many college students do not have the knowledge to make traditional dishes from simple ingredients, or cook a meal from scratch. Purpose: To evaluate the association between participants’ perceived cooking skills, food preparation frequency, selected indicators of diet quality and BMI. Methods: Non-experimental cross sectional survey design using questionnaire evaluating confidence in cooking skills (PCSS), food preparation frequencies (FPFS), diet quality (frequency of consumption of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and low-fat dairy), and anthropometrics among 968 students at one Midwestern university. Correlations and chi square were performed to determine the relationships of PCSS/FPFS, indicators of healthy eating and BMI, and differences in response per variable, respectively. Results: Over half reported feeling very confident in their cooking skills; 15% report preparing meals daily. Higher PCSS was correlated to higher vegetable intake (P<0.001) and meeting the recommendations for vegetables (P<0.001). PCSS was not associated with meeting recommendations for fruits, whole grains, or low-fat dairy. Higher PCSS was correlated with higher BMI (P=0.001). PCSS was positively associated with FPFS (P<0.001). Although higher PCSS was not associated with fruit, whole grain, and low-fat dairy intake, students with higher PCSS may be more likely to prepare and consume vegetables.

Keywords