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Burgess, S. R., Stermer, S. P., & Burgess, M. C. (2012). Video game playing and academic performance in college students. College Student Journal, 46(2), 376.

has been cited by the following article:

Article

The Relationship between Videogame Use, Deviant Behavior, and Academic Achievement among a Nationally Representative Sample of High School Seniors in the United States

1Human Services, Liberty University, Lynchburg, VA, United States

2Nova Southwestern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL, United States

3Management (Economy and Tourism), Universidad de las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain


American Journal of Educational Research. 2016, Vol. 4 No. 16, 1157-1163
DOI: 10.12691/education-4-16-6
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Luis Concepcion, Marilyn Nales-Torres, Ana Rodriguez-Zubiaurre. The Relationship between Videogame Use, Deviant Behavior, and Academic Achievement among a Nationally Representative Sample of High School Seniors in the United States. American Journal of Educational Research. 2016; 4(16):1157-1163. doi: 10.12691/education-4-16-6.

Correspondence to: Luis  Concepcion, Human Services, Liberty University, Lynchburg, VA, United States. Email: lrconcepcion@liberty.edu

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between video games and academic performance. Previous research has been mixed with some studies indicating a negative relationship, while others have indicated a positive association. The influence of a moderating variable, deviant behavior, was investigated, as it is hypothesized that students who frequently use videogames and participate in deviant behavior will experience low academic achievement, whereas videogame use will not affect the achievement of students who do not participate in deviant behavior. Using correlation and hierarchical regression analysis of a national sample (the 2013 “Monitoring the Future” (MTF) survey [1]), no statistically significant moderating effect for deviance was discerned. Without a moderating effect, students engaging in a greater number of video games had higher academic achievement, as measured in GPA.

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