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Anderman, E. M., & Midgley, C. (1997). Changes in achievement goal orientations, perceived academic competence, and grades across the transition to middle-level schools. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 22(3), 269-298.

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Article

Change and Stability in Achievement Goals Based on Instructional Tasks of a College Classroom

1Vice Provost Office for Undergraduate Affairs, University of Illinois at Chicago


American Journal of Educational Research. 2016, Vol. 4 No. 14, 999-1007
DOI: 10.12691/education-4-14-3
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Cheon-woo Han. Change and Stability in Achievement Goals Based on Instructional Tasks of a College Classroom. American Journal of Educational Research. 2016; 4(14):999-1007. doi: 10.12691/education-4-14-3.

Correspondence to: Cheon-woo  Han, Vice Provost Office for Undergraduate Affairs, University of Illinois at Chicago. Email: cwhan@uic.edu

Abstract

Achievement goals play a principal role in enhancing learning gains and adaptive attitudes. Little is known, however, about changes and/or stability in achievement goals over time. This study focused on the research hypothesis that instructional tasks (e.g., exam, in-class quiz, writing a paper, in-class activates) of a course which are focused on competence influence differentially the adoption of college students’ achievement goals in a real classroom. A total of 186 college students from an introductory educational psychology course participated in this study. All achievement goals had high stability for each instructional task using a differential continuity analytic approach, while mean-level change analyses showed a considerable decline of each individual goal pursuit. Cluster analysis technique, which is a person-centered approach, suggested changes in cluster memberships between the pre- and post-measure of achievement goals. The results and findings of the current study provide important implications for both instructional design in a classroom and research methodologies used to investigate achievement goals.

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