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Article

Impact of Point of Sale Nutritional Information and Dietary and Exercise Habits of College Students in Missouri

1Department of Business, Columbia College, 1001 Rogers Street, Columbia, MO 65216, USA

2Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, 412 Savage Hall, Ithaca, NY 14850, USA


Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2016, Vol. 4 No. 3, 195-200
DOI: 10.12691/jfnr-4-3-10
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
David Ruggeri, Rebecca Seguin. Impact of Point of Sale Nutritional Information and Dietary and Exercise Habits of College Students in Missouri. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. 2016; 4(3):195-200. doi: 10.12691/jfnr-4-3-10.

Correspondence to: David  Ruggeri, Department of Business, Columbia College, 1001 Rogers Street, Columbia, MO 65216, USA. Email: daveruggeri@gmail.com

Abstract

Poor dietary and exercise habits can lead to many negative health outcomes later in life. The eating and exercise behaviors of college students are of particular importance as many life-long habits are formed during this period in their lives. This study examined the current eating and exercise habits of traditional college students at a small liberal arts college in Columbia, Missouri. Traditional day students (N=884) were e-mailed a survey to their college assigned e-mail address, with 96 students completing the survey. Those who received the survey link had access to all campus resources, such as the gymnasium, dorms, and dining halls. 55.21% of respondents indicated that their current level of physical activity was less now than when they were a senior in high school. Even though the dining hall displayed nutritional information for all entrees, 26.32% of the students indicated that they were aware that the nutritional information was posted, 23.16% of students indicated that no nutritional information was posted, and 50.53% stated that they didn’t know. Students who indicated that they were aware that the nutritional information was posted reported exercising on average 5.29 hours per week compared to 4.72 hours for those who reported no nutritional information was posted and 3.81 hours per week for those who reported they did not know. Students who were aware of the posted nutritional information also ate at fast food restaurants less often (2.68 times per week) than those who stated no information were posted (3.52 times per week) and those who did not know (4.38 times per week). Of the participants 25% reported that they are unaware of their daily-recommended caloric intake.

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