Article citationsMore >>

Pinelo M, Rubilar M, Sineiro J, Nunez MJ. Extraction of antioxidant phenolics from almond hulls (Prunus amygdalus) and pine sawdust (Pinus pinaster). Food Chem 2004; 2(85): 267-273.

has been cited by the following article:

Article

Extraction of Bioactive Compound from Some Fruits and Vegetables (Pomegranate Peel, Carrot and Tomato)

1Department of Food Engineering and Technology, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University, Dinajpur, Bangladesh

2Department of Food and Process Engineering, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University, Dinajpur, Bangladesh

3Department of Food & food service industry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea

4Department of Food Processing and Preservation, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University, Dinajpur, Bangladesh

5Institute of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Dhaka, Bangladesh


American Journal of Food and Nutrition. 2016, Vol. 4 No. 1, 8-19
DOI: 10.12691/ajfn-4-1-2
Copyright © 2016 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Tajnuba Sharmin, Neaj Ahmed, Abul Hossain, Md. Mojaffor Hosain, Shakti Chandra Mondal, Md. Raihanul Haque, Mohammed Almas, Md. Abu Bakkar Siddik. Extraction of Bioactive Compound from Some Fruits and Vegetables (Pomegranate Peel, Carrot and Tomato). American Journal of Food and Nutrition. 2016; 4(1):8-19. doi: 10.12691/ajfn-4-1-2.

Correspondence to: Tajnuba  Sharmin, Department of Food Engineering and Technology, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University, Dinajpur, Bangladesh. Email: itstajnuba@gmail.com

Abstract

The effects of different solvents, temperature conditions and solvent-solid ratios on solid-solvent extraction of the total phenolic and flavonoids herein also referred to as antioxidant from pomegranate marc peel (PMP) was studied. Water, methanol, ethanol and acetone extraction efficiencies at extraction times of 5 to 60 min, extraction temperatures of 25 to 95°C, ratios of solvent/solid of 5:1 to 50:1 and particle size of 40 mesh were evaluated. At 40°C, solvent/solid ratio of 15:1, extraction time of 30 min and particle size of 40 mesh, methanol gave the highest content of the total phenolic and flavonoids (18.3, 2.8)%, followed by water (14.1, 2.1)%, ethanol (8.37, 2.55)%, and acetone (7.65,1.8)%, respectively. Beta-carotenes are extracted from carrot under different conditions involving different temperatures, treatment of samples, and solvents (ethanol, methanol). Carrot roots were tested for the extraction yields of carotenes at temperatures 20°C, 40°C, and 60°C, the samples having been examined after harvest, after cold storage (stored at 5°C), and after freezing (–5°C). The best extraction efficiency was achieved with the samples treated by freezing and using the extraction 60°C for 2–4 hours. Extraction of lycopene from tomato under different conditions involving different time and solvents (hexane, petroleum benzene and hexane: ethanol: petroleum benzene). Under the best conditions, ternary mixture gave the highest lycopene content (12.3 mg/100g), followed by hexane (9.4mg/100g), petroleum benzene (8.7mg/100g). At 20°C, the yield of carotenes from the fresh after-harvest sample was slightly affected by the time and temperature. After 5 h of extraction, the fresh sample showed 1.58 mg/100 g of carotene yield, the velocity of extraction being very slow. With the extraction at 40°C, the yield of carotenes (2.45 mg/100 g) was higher compared to that at 20°C while the highest extraction yield was found at 60°C. At 60°C, the extraction maximum was found in the second hour of extraction (4.28 mg/100 g). After this time, the extraction yield of β-carotene decreased. Compared to the third and fourth hours, the extraction was almost the same as the result of the degradation and loss of carotenes.

Keywords