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Beyth-Marom, R., Saporta, K., & Caspi, A., “Synchronous vs. asynchronous tutorials: Factors affecting students’ preferences and choices,” Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 37(3), 245-262, 2005.

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Article

Examining the Attitudes and Intention to Use Synchronous Distance Learning Technology among Pre-service Teachers: A Qualitative Perspective of Technology Acceptance Model

1Department of Instructional Technology, Balikesir University, Balikesir, Turkey

2Mehmetçik Secondary School, Balikesir, Turkey

3Turkish Land Forces Non-Commissioned Officer College, Balikesir, Turkey


American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, Vol. 3 No. 10A, 17-25
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-10A-3
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
M.Tuncay Sarıtaş, Emel Yıldız, Hüseyin Can ŞENEL. Examining the Attitudes and Intention to Use Synchronous Distance Learning Technology among Pre-service Teachers: A Qualitative Perspective of Technology Acceptance Model. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(10A):17-25. doi: 10.12691/education-3-10A-3.

Correspondence to: M.Tuncay  Sarıtaş, Department of Instructional Technology, Balikesir University, Balikesir, Turkey. Email: tuncaysaritas@gmail.com

Abstract

“Synchronous” distance learning environments are becoming prevalent with the rapid developments in information and communication technologies allowing participants to be actively engaged in collaborative learning activities at a distance. Innovative synchronous distance learning tools provide alternative, flexible, and rich learning opportunities, which could highly be consistent with the demands and needs of the 21st century learners. It is therefore crucial for teachers of today to develop a positive attitude toward this kind of learning environment and have an intention to use it in their work life. This study aimed at examining the attitudes of pre-service teachers toward distance education and their acceptance status of the technology supporting synchronous distance learning experience. After a four-week distance course offered by four instructors from different universities at a distance, the findings indicate that the participants developed positive attitudes toward distance education. Based on the results, we discuss the pre-service teachers who accepted this technology based on three factors: perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and intention to use it again.

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