Article citationsMore >>

Two online sources for balloons are: T. Myers Magic, Inc. 6513 Thomas Springs Rd., Austin, TX 78736, http://www.tmyers.com/; and La Rock’s Fun and Magic Outlet, 1511 S. Industrial Park Rd., Lincolnton, NC 28092, http://www.larocks.com/.

has been cited by the following article:

Article

Using Balloons to Model Pi-Conjugated Systems and to Teach Frontier Molecular Orbital Theory

1Department of Chemistry, Tennessee Tech University, 55 University Drive, Cookeville, TN 38505 United States


World Journal of Chemical Education. 2018, Vol. 6 No. 2, 102-106
DOI: 10.12691/wjce-6-2-5
Copyright © 2018 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Daniel J. Swartling, Janet G. Coonce, Derek J. Cashman. Using Balloons to Model Pi-Conjugated Systems and to Teach Frontier Molecular Orbital Theory. World Journal of Chemical Education. 2018; 6(2):102-106. doi: 10.12691/wjce-6-2-5.

Correspondence to: Daniel  J. Swartling, Department of Chemistry, Tennessee Tech University, 55 University Drive, Cookeville, TN 38505 United States. Email: dswart@tntech.edu

Abstract

Large-scale molecular orbital balloon models have been designed and developed for implementation in the general, organic, or physical chemistry classroom. The purposes of the models are to help students visualize and understand concepts of pi-bonding, conjugation, aromaticity, and cycloaddition reactions or symmetry-controlled reactions. Second-semester organic chemistry students have welcomed the models with positive responses, claiming that the 3D models bring 2D textbook and lecture images to life. The balloon models may be constructed and presented by the instructor during a formal lecture, or they may be constructed by students during problem-solving workshops. Short video tutorials have been created to demonstrate the construction of these inexpensive classroom manipulatives.

Keywords