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Aboul-Enein, B.H. (2010). “The cultural gap delivering health care services to Arab American populations in the United States”, Journal of Cultural Diversity, 17(1), 20.

has been cited by the following article:

Article

Self-Disclosure among Men and Women of Arab Descent: Implications for Group-Based Health Education

1Department of Pharmacy Practice, Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Detroit, USA

2Division of Practice Advancement and Clinical Education, University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill, USA

3Department of Sociology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, USA


American Journal of Educational Research. 2018, Vol. 6 No. 3, 196-200
DOI: 10.12691/education-6-3-6
Copyright © 2018 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Elizabeth A. Bertran, Nicole R. Pinelli, Dana El Masri, Stephen J. Sills, Linda Jaber. Self-Disclosure among Men and Women of Arab Descent: Implications for Group-Based Health Education. American Journal of Educational Research. 2018; 6(3):196-200. doi: 10.12691/education-6-3-6.

Correspondence to: Linda  Jaber, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Detroit, USA. Email: ljaber@wayne.edu

Abstract

Arab American gender norms may affect female participation in group-delivered health education settings. Our objective was to examine gender-specific participation in Arab American group interactions. This study was conducted to inform the necessity of gender-specific groups in a subsequent diabetes prevention intervention. Self-identified Arabs or Arab Americans ≥ 30 years and without diabetes were randomly recruited. Participants were randomly assigned to male-only, female-only, or mixed-gender focus groups. A trained Arabic-speaking moderator facilitated 90-minute sessions using a standardized guide. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. A self-disclosure survey immediately followed sessions. Turn-taking, verbosity, and survey responses were compared between males and females in gender-specific and mixed-gender group settings. Twenty-nine individuals participated: male-only (8), female-only (12), and mixed-gender (9). Males took more turns and spoke with more utterances than females during gender-specific and mixed-gender groups. Fewer men reported keeping comments to themselves relative to women. Group-formatted educational interventions in Arab Americans should take self-disclosure into consideration and efforts should be made to identify females who prefer participating in a gender-specific group.

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