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Article

The Association between Central Obesity and the Risk of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Case-control Study

1Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, Al-Iraqia University Baghdad, Iraq


American Journal of Medical Sciences and Medicine. 2017, Vol. 5 No. 2, 23-26
DOI: 10.12691/ajmsm-5-2-1
Copyright © 2017 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Bilal Natiq Nuaman. The Association between Central Obesity and the Risk of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Case-control Study. American Journal of Medical Sciences and Medicine. 2017; 5(2):23-26. doi: 10.12691/ajmsm-5-2-1.

Correspondence to: Bilal  Natiq Nuaman, Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, Al-Iraqia University Baghdad, Iraq. Email: Bilal_natiq@yahoo.com

Abstract

Background: Central obesity and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) are common medical conditions with similar etiologic mechanisms. There are limited studies to evaluate the association between obesity, especially central obesity; with IBS. Establishing such association is important in the management of IBS. Objective: To evaluate the association between central obesity and IBS in Iraqi patients using Waist-to-Height ratio (WtHR) as an index of central obesity. Patients and Methods: Central obesity defined by Waist-to-Height ratio > 0.5. Inclusion and exclusion criteria for diagnosing IBS were used. A case-control study was performed at AL-Nuaman Teaching Hospital in the period from January 2015 to December 2015, Comparing Waist-to-Height ratio (WtHR) between 75 patients (with IBS) and 130 controls (without IBS) to assess the association between central obesity and IBS. Chi-square test with 95% confidence was used to evaluate association between central obesity and IBS, and Odds ratio (OR) for central obesity was determined. Results: There is significant association between central obesity and IBS, x2 (1) = 36.2, P < 0.001). The strength of association using phi coefficient is medium positive (φ=42, p<0.001). Conclusion: Central obesity is significantly associated with IBS and may be regarded as a risk factor for IBS.

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