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Haraszthy, V.I.; Zambon, J.J.; Sreenivasan P.K. Evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of dentifrices on human oral bacteria. J. Clin. Dent., 2010, 21, 96-100.

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The Immunomodulatory, Antimicrobial and Bactericidal Efficacy of Commonly Used Commercial Household Disinfectants, Sterilizers and Antiseptics in Vitro: Laboratory Assessment of Anti-Inflammatory Infection Control Mechanisms and Comparative Biochemical Analysis of the Microbial Growth of Gram-Negative Bacteria

1Cellular and Molecular Physiology and Immunology Signaling Research Group, Biomedical Laboratory and Clinical Sciences Division, Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Beirut Arab University, Beirut, Lebanon


American Journal of Medical and Biological Research. 2015, Vol. 3 No. 1, 1-32
DOI: 10.12691/ajmbr-3-1-1
Copyright © 2015 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Niveen M. Masri, Lama B. Hanbali, John J. Haddad. The Immunomodulatory, Antimicrobial and Bactericidal Efficacy of Commonly Used Commercial Household Disinfectants, Sterilizers and Antiseptics in Vitro: Laboratory Assessment of Anti-Inflammatory Infection Control Mechanisms and Comparative Biochemical Analysis of the Microbial Growth of Gram-Negative Bacteria. American Journal of Medical and Biological Research. 2015; 3(1):1-32. doi: 10.12691/ajmbr-3-1-1.

Correspondence to: John  J. Haddad, Cellular and Molecular Physiology and Immunology Signaling Research Group, Biomedical Laboratory and Clinical Sciences Division, Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Beirut Arab University, Beirut, Lebanon. Email: john.haddad@yahoo.co.uk

Abstract

Background: Immunomodulatory/anti-inflammatory and microbial infection control strategies characterize the spiral evolution of public awareness of health safety issues. This is substantiated with burgeoning number of cases of microbial contamination and/or infection in myriad healthcare settings, at the hospital, and even at home. Previously, we have investigated and identified laboratory parameters in the assessment of the antimicrobial effects of a myriad of commercial disinfectants on the growth of pathogenic and saprophytic gram-positive bacteria. The present sequel study investigates the antimicrobial/bactericidal effects of commercially available disinfectants, sterilizers, antiseptics, and chlorhexidine-containing detergents on the growth of saprophytic and pathogenic gram-negative bacteria in vitro. It is an unprecedented wide canopy enveloping standardized comparative assessments of the antimicrobial efficiency of consumer-targeted household detergents, curbing and containing microbial infection, inflammation and contamination propensity. Methods: Given the medical significance and impact of public infection control, we have meticulously examined at least 22 different detergents categorized into four classes (each category comprises a variety of commercially available products commonly used by the public): i) Class A – Daily Mouthwash; ii) Class B – Toilet Bowl Cleaners/Bleaches/Sanitizers; iii) Class C – Surface and Floor Mopping Cleaners/Detergents; and iv) Class D – Hand and Body Wash Gels. Whilst the canonical menu of active ingredients varies among those aforementioned classes, antimicrobial components are well established. Results: Regarding Class A, the most effective against Citrobacter koseri is ‘Colgate Plax Mouthwash’; Enterobacter cloacae is ‘Colgate Plax Mouthwash’; Escherichia coli is ‘Colgate Plax Mouthwash’; Escherichia coli ESBL is ‘Colgate Plax Mouthwash’; Klebsiella pneumoniae is ‘Colgate Plax Mouthwash’; Proteus vulgaris is ‘Colgate Plax Mouthwash’; Pseudomonas aeruginosa is ‘Perio.Kin Chlorhexidina 0.20 %’; Salmonella typhimurium is ‘Colgate Plax Mouthwash’; and Shigella sonnei is ‘Colgate Plax Mouthwash’. Regarding Class B, the most effective against C. koseri is ‘Harpic Power Plus Disinfectant’; E. cloacae is ‘WC Net Bleach Gel’; E. coli is ‘WC Net Bleach Gel’; E. coli ESBL is ‘WC Net Bleach Gel’; K. pneumoniae are ‘WC Net Bleach Gel’ and ‘Harpic Power Plus Disinfectant’; P. vulgaris is ‘Spartan Max WC Lavender’; P. aeruginosa is ‘WC Net Bleach Gel’; S. typhimurium is ‘Clorox Bleach Rain Clean’; and S. sonnei is ‘Harpic Power Plus Disinfectant’. Regarding Class C, the most effective against C. koseri is ‘Dettol Antiseptic/Disinfectant’; E. cloacae is ‘Dettol Antiseptic/Disinfectant’; E. coli is ‘Vim Cream Multipurpose Fast Rinsing’; E. coli ESBL is ‘Dettol Antiseptic/Disinfectant’; K. pneumoniae is ‘Dettol Antiseptic/Disinfectant’; P. vulgaris is ‘Dettol Antiseptic/Disinfectant’; P. aeruginosa is ‘Dettol Antiseptic/Disinfectant’; S. typhimurium is ‘Dettol Antiseptic/Disinfectant’; and S. sonnei is ‘Dettol Antiseptic/Disinfectant’. Regarding Class D, the most effective against C. koseri, E. cloacae, E. coli, E. coli ESBL, K. pneumoniae, P. vulgaris, P. aeruginosa, S. typhimurium, and S. sonnei is unprecedentedly the ‘HiGeen Hand and Body Wash Gel’.

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