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Emmy-EGBE, I.O., et.al. Prevalence of Intestinal helminthes in students of Ihiala local government area of Anambra state, 2012; Journal of Applied Technology in Environmental Sanitation, 2 (1): 23-30.

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Article

Parasitic Infection and Associated Factors among the Primary School Children in Motta Town, Western Amhara, Ethiopia

1School of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Bahir Dar University Ethiopia


American Journal of Public Health Research. 2014, Vol. 2 No. 6, 248-254
DOI: 10.12691/ajphr-2-6-6
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Mulusew Andualem Asemahagn. Parasitic Infection and Associated Factors among the Primary School Children in Motta Town, Western Amhara, Ethiopia. American Journal of Public Health Research. 2014; 2(6):248-254. doi: 10.12691/ajphr-2-6-6.

Correspondence to: Mulusew  Andualem Asemahagn, School of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Bahir Dar University Ethiopia. Email: muler.hi@gmail.com

Abstract

Background: Globally, about 3.5 billion and 45 million people, particularly children are affected and ill with parasitic infection respectively. Intestinal parasitic infection constitutes one of the ten top major public health problems in resource-limited countries. Methods: An institutional based cross sectional study was conducted among 364 randomly selected students from the Motta primary School, November 2014. A pretested structured questionnaire was used to collect data on socio-demographic and associated risk factors. The stool specimens were examined using a direct wet mount and formal-ether concentration techniques. Epi-Info version 3.5.4 and SPSS version16 were used to enter and analyze data respectively. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were used to describe study objectives and indentify associated factors respectively. The strength of association between the study and outcome variables was described using Odds ratio at a 95% CI. Results: The majority (98.3%) of the students gave sample in the study. About 245 (68.4%) of the respondents were infected with one or more species of intestinal parasites. Six types of intestinal parasites were identified and the most prevalent parasite was Hookworm 81(33.1%) followed by Entamoeba histolytica 42(17.1%), Ascaris lumbricoides 38 (15.5%), and Giardia lamblia 29 (11.8%). Double parasitic infection was found among 45(18.4%) students. Residence, health education access, family education, shoe wearing habits, hand washing practices, toilet availability and use, family income, availability of safe water, and open defecation practices were significant factors (p < 0.05) for intestinal parasitic infection. Conclusion: Intestinal parasitic infection is an important major health problem among Motta primary school students. Improving environmental/personal hygiene, availing water supply, providing health education to students and families, and availing toilet services are some of the important interventions to solve the problem.

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