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Force MV. “The relationship between effective nurse mangers and nursing retention”. Journal of Nursing Administration, 35, 336-341, 2005.

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Article

Nurses’ Perception of Managers’ Leadership Styles and Its Associated Outcomes

1King Saud University, P.O. Box 642 Riyadh

2Community Health Nursing, Al Farabi College, Riyadh, KSA, Faculty of Nursing- The University of Jordan

3Division of Nursing, Winston-Salem State University

4King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, KSA


American Journal of Nursing Research. 2014, Vol. 2 No. 4, 57-62
DOI: 10.12691/ajnr-2-4-1
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Ahmad E. Aboshaiqah, Ayman M. Hamdan-Mansour, Dennis R. Sherrod, Ahmed Alkhaibary, Sultan Alkhaibary. Nurses’ Perception of Managers’ Leadership Styles and Its Associated Outcomes. American Journal of Nursing Research. 2014; 2(4):57-62. doi: 10.12691/ajnr-2-4-1.

Correspondence to: Ayman  M. Hamdan-Mansour, Community Health Nursing, Al Farabi College, Riyadh, KSA, Faculty of Nursing- The University of Jordan. Email: a.mansour@ju.edu.jo

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine leadership styles, factors, and outcomes perceived by. Cross sectional descript correlational design utilized to collect data from 272 nurses in two major government-owned, tertiary hospitals in Saudi Arabia. Data collected in regards to nurses’ perception of their supervisors’ leadership styles and outcome factors. Nurses had a perception that their supervisors are more frequently using transformation and transactional than laissez-faire leadership styles. There was positive correlation between outcome factors (effectiveness, extra efforts and satisfaction) and transformational (r = .77, .74, .74; p < .001) and transactional leadership styles (.39, .42, .34; p < .001) and negative with laissez-faire leadership style (-.25, -.13, -.29, p < .05). that there were significant differences between male and female nurses in regards to using transactional leadership style (t = 2.74, p < .001) and laissez-faire leadership style (t = 3.35, p < .001) with male nurses mean score higher than female nurses mean score in both styles (transactional style: male = 2.60, female 2.31; laissez-faire leadership style: male = 2.04, female = 1.41). Findings provide supporting evidence that a combination of leadership styles to attain desired goals and further studies are suggested to explore leadership best practices.

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