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Rortveit G, Brown JS, Thom DH, Van Den Eeden SK, Creasman JM, Subak LL. Symptomatic pelvic organ prolapsed: prevalence and risk factors in a population-based, racially diverse cohort. Obstet Gynecol 2007; 109(6):1396-1403.

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Article

An Audit of Uterovaginal Prolapse in Enugu, Southeast Nigeria

1Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH), Enugu, Nigeria


American Journal of Clinical Medicine Research. 2013, Vol. 1 No. 1, 23-25
DOI: 10.12691/ajcmr-1-1-6
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
OKEKE TC, ANI VC, EZENYEAKU CCT, IKEAKO LC, ENWEREJI JO, EKWUAZI K. An Audit of Uterovaginal Prolapse in Enugu, Southeast Nigeria. American Journal of Clinical Medicine Research. 2013; 1(1):23-25. doi: 10.12691/ajcmr-1-1-6.

Correspondence to: OKEKE TC, Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH), Enugu, Nigeria. Email: ubabiketochukwu@yahoo.com

Abstract

A retrospective study of utero-vaginal prolapse to determine the frequency and determinants of uterovaginal prolapse, degrees and its complications at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH) between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2009. The prevalence of uterovaginal prolapse was 3.4%. Thirty three (66%) of them were postmenopausal. Multiparity was a significant determinant as 74% of them were grand-multiparous. The commonest symptom was ‘something coming down the vagina’ in 96% of the study subjects. Second degree prolapse was the commonest type of presentation (48%) and the definitive treatment modality was vaginal hysterectomy with pelvic floor repair (44%). Multiparity, prolonged labour and unsupervised deliveries are significant determinants. Uterovaginal prolapse is primarily a common gynaecological condition of the parous and elderly postmenopausal women associated with a decreased body image and quality of life. Education of women, women empowerment, effective antenatal care, supervised hospital deliveries, and limiting the family size by efficient contraception deserve priority attention to prevent this social malady.

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