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Hahn, T., Foldspang, A., Vestergaard, E., and Ingemann-Hansen, T., “One-leg standing balance and sports activity,” Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 9 (1). 15-18. 1999.

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Article

Characteristics of Static and Dynamic Balance Abilities in Competitive Swimmers

1Department of Industrial Business and Engineering, Fukui University of Technology, Fukui, Japan

2Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Ishikawa, Japan

3Faculty of Science Division, Tokyo University of Science, Tokyo, Japan

4Department of Health and Sports Sciences, Niigata University of Health and Welfare, Nigata, Japan

5Graduate School of Human and Socio-Environmental Studies, Kanazawa University, Ishikawa, Japan

6Human and Socio-Environmental Studies, Kanazawa University, Ishikawa, Japan


American Journal of Sports Science and Medicine. 2014, Vol. 2 No. 6, 208-211
DOI: 10.12691/ajssm-2-6-1
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Hiroki Sugiura, Shinichi Demura, Tamotsu Kitabayashi, Yoshimitsu Shimoyama, Daisuke Sato, Ning Xu, Yuko Asakura. Characteristics of Static and Dynamic Balance Abilities in Competitive Swimmers. American Journal of Sports Science and Medicine. 2014; 2(6):208-211. doi: 10.12691/ajssm-2-6-1.

Correspondence to: Hiroki  Sugiura, Department of Industrial Business and Engineering, Fukui University of Technology, Fukui, Japan. Email: sugiura@fukui-ut.ac.jp

Abstract

Competitive swimmers may have inferior balance because antigravity strength exertion, which is used to stand, is not often necessary in the water. This study concerns the ability to stand with the manipulating and supporting legs and their laterality by examining 16 male competitive swimmers (age: 19.4±1.0 years, career: 13.7±2.1 years) and 16 male general university students (age: 20.6±1.2 years). Static balance and dynamic balance were evaluated by the center sway of foot pressure and stability on an unstable stool, respectively. The total path length, mean path length, maximal amplitude rectangle, root mean square area, and outline area for the former and the fluctuation index for the latter were selected as evaluation parameters. The results of a two-way ANOVA (group × leg) showed no significant difference in both the group and leg factors for static balance parameters. In contrast, the dynamic balance parameter showed a significant difference in both. Stability on an unstable stool was higher in the swimmer group than in the general student group and in the manipulating leg than in the supporting leg in both groups. In conclusion, dynamic balance while standing with the manipulating or supporting leg is superior in competitive swimmers, unlike static balance assessed by the center sway of foot pressure. In addition, dynamic balance in the manipulating leg is superior to that in the supporting leg for both groups.

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