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Aworh, O.C. The Role of Traditional Food Processing Technologies in National Development: the West African Experience. International Union of Food Science & Technology, 2008, 1: 1-18.

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Article

Proximate Composition, Biochemical and Microbiological Changes Associated with Fermenting African Oil Bean (Pentaclethra macrophylla Benth) Seeds

1Department of Microbiology, College of Natural Sciences, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture Umudike, Abia State, Nigeria


American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2014, Vol. 2 No. 5, 138-142
DOI: 10.12691/ajmr-2-5-3
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Eze V.C, Onwuakor C.E, Ukeka E. Proximate Composition, Biochemical and Microbiological Changes Associated with Fermenting African Oil Bean (Pentaclethra macrophylla Benth) Seeds . American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2014; 2(5):138-142. doi: 10.12691/ajmr-2-5-3.

Correspondence to: Eze  V.C, Department of Microbiology, College of Natural Sciences, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture Umudike, Abia State, Nigeria. Email: mekus2020@gmail.com

Abstract

The proximate composition, biochemical changes and microbiology of fermenting Pentaclethra macrophylla (Ugba) seeds were evaluated. Studies were carried out to screen for microorganisms associated with the natural fermentation of the oil bean seeds. Bacterial isolates obtained include species of Bacillus, Streptococcus, Salmonella, Micrococcus, Lactobacillus and Proteus. Fungal isolates include Yeast, species of Penicillium, Aspergillus, Fusarium and Rhizopus. Total aerobic counts (TAC) ranged from 1.5 x 106 to 2.5 x 106 cfu/g, while total coliform counts (TCC) ranged from 1.7 x 103 to 7.2 x 103 cfu/g. More so, total lactic acid bacterial counts ranged from 2.6 x 105 to 4.6 x 105 cfu/g. Among the various bacterial isolates obtained from the fermenting Ugba, Bacillus and lactic acid bacteria were dominant from the beginning to the end of the fermentation the oil bean seeds. The proximate composition of the fermenting seeds showed the presence of protein, fats, fibre, carbohydrates, and ash. Temperature variations in oil bean seed fermentation showed higher temperatures in the purchased Ugba compared to the laboratory Ugba after 72 hours fermentation. There were significant reduction in pH and titratable acidity as the fermentation time progressed, showing that temperature, pH and titratable acidity of fermenting African oil bean seeds were affected by the metabolic activities of resident microorganisms.

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