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Article

Genetic Testing for Risk of Lung Cancer: A Pilot Study Examining Perceived Benefits and Barriers using Health Belief Model

1Division of Social and Administrative Sciences in Pharmacy, Oscar Rennebohm School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin-Madison

2Arnold & Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York City

3School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Suwanee, Georgia


American Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2014, Vol. 2 No. 2, 24-30
DOI: 10.12691/ajcp-2-2-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Karishma Desai, Bupendra Shah, Hamid Rahim, Hongjun Yin, John Lonie. Genetic Testing for Risk of Lung Cancer: A Pilot Study Examining Perceived Benefits and Barriers using Health Belief Model. American Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2014; 2(2):24-30. doi: 10.12691/ajcp-2-2-2.

Correspondence to: Karishma  Desai, Division of Social and Administrative Sciences in Pharmacy, Oscar Rennebohm School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Email: desaikaru@gmail.com

Abstract

Aim: To (i) assess participants’ awareness of the availability of genetic testing to determine the risk of different types of cancer; (ii) to assess participants’ beliefs about genetic testing for the risk of lung cancer using Health Belief Model; and (iii) to explore factors affecting intention to use genetic testing for risk of lung cancer. Methods: A sample of 360 New Jersey residents were surveyed by interviewers from three densely populated cities in the northern, central and southern regions of New Jersey. The survey instrument was developed using the Health Belief Model and measures were adapted from the literature. Descriptive statistics and regression analyses were used to examine factors associated with intention to use genetic testing. Results: A total of 360 individuals were surveyed in three cities in New Jersey. Of these, 50% were non-Hispanic White, female, and with an annual income of less than $50,000; 66% were nonsmokers without a family history of lung cancer. The overall intention to use the genetic test to determine lung cancer risk was low (35%), even though the majority of participants believed genetic testing for lung cancer to be highly beneficial, and despite believing it to be a severe condition [M(SD)=11.5(2.3)}. Approximately 50% of participants were aware of the availability of genetic tests for the risk of lung cancer, and respondents believed they were moderately susceptible to lung cancer [M(SD)=25.3(3.7)].Gender, education, smoking habits and perceived benefits of testing were significant predictors of intention. Conclusion: Awareness and intention to use genetic testing for the risk of lung cancer was low. This study provides useful information for healthcare professionals interested in promoting the use of genetic testing for at-risk populations such as smokers, and how to tailor interventions.

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