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Article

Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Toddler Swimming Routines

1Trauma and Injury Research Center, Dell Children’s Medical Center, Austin, TX, USA

2Kinesiology Department, University of the Incarnate Word, San Antonio, TX, USA

3Trauma Services, Dell Children’s Medical Center, Austin, TX, USA

4Department of Surgery and Perioperative Care, Dell Medical School, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA


Journal of Physical Activity Research. 2021, Vol. 6 No. 2, 107-111
DOI: 10.12691/jpar-6-2-7
Copyright © 2021 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Molly B. Johnson, Elizabeth D. Boriack, Carlee M. McConnell, Karla A. Lawson. Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Toddler Swimming Routines. Journal of Physical Activity Research. 2021; 6(2):107-111. doi: 10.12691/jpar-6-2-7.

Correspondence to: Molly  B. Johnson, Trauma and Injury Research Center, Dell Children’s Medical Center, Austin, TX, USA. Email: molly.johnson2@ascension.org

Abstract

Swimming is a common pastime and important developmental activity for toddlers. The aim of this research was to explore changes in swim routines for toddlers due to the COVID-19 pandemic. An online survey asked 448 caregivers of toddlers about changes they made to their swimming routine due to the pandemic. Many participants reported swimming less often and delaying swimming lessons for their toddlers. Compared with typical routines, during the pandemic, there were significant differences in how often caregivers swam with their toddler and in the percentage of caregivers who reported swimming with their toddler in open water, at public pools, and at friends’ or relatives’ pools, but not in home pools. Results highlight a reduction in access to water, swimming opportunities, and swimming lessons for toddlers as a result of COVID-19. Future research should identify long-term consequences the changes may have on water familiarity and competency, physical activity, and drowning risk.

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