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Bureau of International Labor Affairs, Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports, Zambia: 2018 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor, Bureau of International Labor Affairs, New York, 2019.

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Article

Legal and Institutional Bases of Child Labour in Zambia

1Department of Political and Administrative Studies, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia


Journal of Sociology and Anthropology. 2021, Vol. 5 No. 1, 1-8
DOI: 10.12691/jsa-5-1-1
Copyright © 2021 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Royd Malisase. Legal and Institutional Bases of Child Labour in Zambia. Journal of Sociology and Anthropology. 2021; 5(1):1-8. doi: 10.12691/jsa-5-1-1.

Correspondence to: Royd  Malisase, Department of Political and Administrative Studies, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia. Email: royd.malisase@unza.zm

Abstract

While most research on child labour focus on socio-economic cause of child labour, this study examined legal and institutional bases of child labour in Zambia. This followed recognition of the prevalence of the vice and the adverse effects it had on children. Using a qualitative design, the study interviewed four government officials from the Ministry of Gender and Child Development and Ministry of Labour and Social Securities as well as reviewed relevant literature. Data was analysed using Thematic and Document Analysis. The study found that laws neither agreed on legal definition of a child nor protected children against being economically exploited by family members. Due to the National Child Policy not being backed by a Child Labour Act, implementation of child protection programs was challenging. Key institutions lacked structures at provincial, district and community levels, making coordination of child protection from the grassroots difficult. Influx of participating ministries also led to functional overlaps and confusions. The legal and institutional framework was therefore unable to eliminate child labour.

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