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AlBarakati, S., “Soft tissue facial profile of adult Saudis.” Saudi Med J. 32 (9), 2011, pp. 836-842.

has been cited by the following article:

Article

Considerations to Planning Orthognathic Surgery in Different Regions of Saudi and the Middle East

1Assistant professor, Umm Alqura University, Oral Maxillofacial Surgery Department, Saudi Arabia

2King Abdulaziz Medical City. Jeddah, Saudi Arabia


American Journal of Public Health Research. 2014, Vol. 2 No. 1, 6-9
DOI: 10.12691/ajphr-2-1-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Mazen Almasri, Sara M. Bukhari. Considerations to Planning Orthognathic Surgery in Different Regions of Saudi and the Middle East. American Journal of Public Health Research. 2014; 2(1):6-9. doi: 10.12691/ajphr-2-1-2.

Correspondence to: Mazen  Almasri, Assistant professor, Umm Alqura University, Oral Maxillofacial Surgery Department, Saudi Arabia. Email: mazen_ajm@yahoo.com

Abstract

Objectives: to properly plan orthongathic surgery and the fine beauty details in it, understanding different ethnic facial norms is necessary. In Saudi, investigating the existence of any facial variation has not been studied before, and hence we are investigating the existence of any variation of soft tissue profile (STP) among Saudi patients in the Southern region (SSA) when compared to the middle region of Saudi (MSA) that require considerations when planning facial surgeries. Material and methods: A retrospective chart review from August 2010 to June 2012 of Patients with class I skeletal relation, no history of orthognathic facial deformity, syndromes nor cleft lip and palate were included in the study. 93 patients with an age ranged from 15-33 years old were compared to a similar group in the MSA. Clinical pictures and lateral cephalometric radiographs superimpositions were used to examine the data and tabulate the results. Results: it has been shown that although similarities exist between the STP of patients in the SSA and MSA, some characters were found significantly different in SSA group such as females showing more microgenic tendency, more acute nasolabial angle and larger interlabial gap than MSA females. While SSA males on as well showed more microgenia and longer face tendency than MSA males. Conclusion: When planning orthognathic surgery for SSA patients, careful consideration for lower facial third character is necessary as tendency toward microgenia in the patient population sounds like a common feature in males and females.

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