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Painter, J. A., Hoekstra, R. M., Ayers, T., Tauxe, R. V., Braden, C. R., Angulo, F. J. and Griffin, P. M. Attribution of foodborne illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths to food commodities by using outbreak data, United States, 1998-2008. Emerging Infectious Diseases; 19(3): 407-415, (2013).

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Article

Carrier Status of Salmonella Species Infection among Students in a Tertiarry Institution

1Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria Enugu Campus, Enugu State, Nigeria


American Journal of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology. 2020, Vol. 8 No. 2, 75-82
DOI: 10.12691/ajidm-8-2-5
Copyright © 2020 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Theophilus Kachi Udeani, Veronica Ngozi Emenuga, Favour Chizaram Sunday. Carrier Status of Salmonella Species Infection among Students in a Tertiarry Institution. American Journal of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology. 2020; 8(2):75-82. doi: 10.12691/ajidm-8-2-5.

Correspondence to: Theophilus  Kachi Udeani, Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria Enugu Campus, Enugu State, Nigeria. Email: Theophilus.udeani@unn.edu.ng

Abstract

Salmonellosis is a major challenge to public health due to its persistence and high rate of recurrence. This study investigated Salmonella infections and associated risk exposures among tertiary students. This cross-sectional study enrolled 100 undergraduate students. Their personal health information and feeding habits were collected using a questionnaire. Fecal specimens were collected and analyzed bacteriologically. The isolates were subjected to antibiotics susceptibility test. Of 100 students enrolled, 38% had Salmonella species. The prevalence rate was Salmonella typhi, 29%, Salmonella. paratyphi A, 6%, and Salmonella enteritidis, 3%. The females accounted for 27% and males 11% of the isolates. The age group of 20-24 years had the highest infection rate. The participants that were not previously diagnosed of Salmonella species infection had a higher carriage rate of 26% than those who were previously diagnosed of typhoid fever (12%), 48% of the students, do not regularly practice hand washing and 63% never had symptoms of typhoid fever. The students patronize food vendors and this accounted for 34% of the Salmonella isolates. Self-medication was associated with the prevalence of Salmonella species (P=0.000; 95% CI). The Salmonella isolates were resistant to Amoxicillin, Cefuroxime and Nitrofurantoin. The carrier rate of Salmonella typhi was high due to antibiotic abuse.

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