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Federal Ministry of Health. National policy on integrated disease surveillance and response. Abuja, Nigeria. 2005. Available from: cheld.org/wp.../National-Policy-on-Integrated-Disease- Surveillance-and-Response.pdf. [Accessed December 12, 2016].

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Article

Completeness of Reporting in the Community-based Disease Surveillance and Notification System in Anambra State, Nigeria

1Department of Community Medicine, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi, Nigeria

2Department of Community Medicine, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka, Nigeria

3Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University


American Journal of Public Health Research. 2020, Vol. 8 No. 3, 77-86
DOI: 10.12691/ajphr-8-3-1
Copyright © 2020 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Chijioke A Ezenyeaku, Chinomnso C Nnebue, Simeon A Nwabueze, Cyril C Ezenyeaku, Ifeanyi N Udedibia, Ifeoma C Iloghalu, Obiageli F Emelumadu. Completeness of Reporting in the Community-based Disease Surveillance and Notification System in Anambra State, Nigeria. American Journal of Public Health Research. 2020; 8(3):77-86. doi: 10.12691/ajphr-8-3-1.

Correspondence to: Chinomnso  C Nnebue, Department of Community Medicine, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi, Nigeria. Email: nnebnons@yahoo.com

Abstract

Background: Community involvement in the disease surveillance and notification (DSN) systems aids in leveraging community structures for improved disease prevention and control. Objective: To determine the completeness of reporting in the CBSS in Anambra State, Nigeria. Materials and methods: This was a cross sectional descriptive mix method study of the CBSS in Anambra State. Quantitative data were obtained using pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaires, interview-administered on 360 community informants, selected by multistage sampling technique, while data on completeness of filling of the community registers were obtained using observation checklist. Analyses were with SPSS version 20 and associations were tested using Chi square, Fisher’s exact and t tests as appropriate. Level of statistical significance was set at 5%. Key informant interviews (KII) were conducted among selected DSN key officers. Data from KII were transcribed verbatim, thematic content analysis done and key quotes noted. Results: The completeness of reporting in the system was 28.1%. Factors such as the source of information on detected disease, record of detected disease kept by community informant in the last one year, the number of times reports were sent in the last one year, feedback received by community informants given to community members, volunteer benefit and satisfaction with being a community informant had associations with completeness (p < 0.05). At the univariate level, keeping records, giving feedbacks to the community and being satisfied with the CBSS were significant predictors of completeness. The KII findings, showed that the commonest reason for sub-optimal functioning of the CBSS was poor funding. Conclusions: This study revealed low level of completeness of reporting of notifiable diseases and sub-optimal functioning of the CBSS in the State. We recommend improved supervision, record keeping, information transmission process and funding of the CBSS in Anambra State.

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