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Minuchin S, Rosman BL, and Baker L. Psychosomatic Families: Anorexia Nervosa in Context. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.1978

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Article

Prevalence and Associated Risks Factors of Psychological Distress among Tuberculosis Patients Receiving Treatment in the Buea and Limbe Regional Hospitals

1Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases, Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, University of Buea, Buea 63, Cameroon

2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Buea, Buea 63, Cameroon

3Department of Public Health and Hygiene, University of Buea, Buea 63, Cameroon

4Department of Zoology and Animal Production, University of Buea, Buea 63, Cameroon


American Journal of Epidemiology and Infectious Disease. 2020, Vol. 8 No. 1, 5-12
DOI: 10.12691/ajeid-8-1-2
Copyright © 2020 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Nkweleko Falone Fankam, Akum Eric Achidi, Tah Aldof Yoah, Eric Berand Fokam, Fai Bafon Theophile. Prevalence and Associated Risks Factors of Psychological Distress among Tuberculosis Patients Receiving Treatment in the Buea and Limbe Regional Hospitals. American Journal of Epidemiology and Infectious Disease. 2020; 8(1):5-12. doi: 10.12691/ajeid-8-1-2.

Correspondence to: Nkweleko  Falone Fankam, Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases, Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, University of Buea, Buea 63, Cameroon. Email: fankam93@yahoo.com

Abstract

Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Mood disorders seem to be particularly common in TB patients. Psychological distress has been shown to reduce adherence to drugs thus negatively impacting prognosis. Objective: The present study was designed to determine the prevalence and associated risk factors of psychological distress among tuberculosis patients in the Buea and Limbe TB treatment centers. Methodology: A cross sectional hospital-based study was carried out to achieve the objective. A structured questionnaire was administered to 300 TB patients to collect socio-demographic data. The Kessler psychological distress scale (k-10) was employed to ascertain the presence or absence of psychological distress. Data was analyzed using stata 13 and Nvivo 10. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify risk factors. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results: The overall prevalence of psychological distress was 43.3% (95%CI: 40.7 - 49.4). The prevalence of mild, moderate and severe psychological distress were 35.3%, 7.0% and 1.0% respectively. Being HIV positive (AOR = 6.10, 95% CI: 2.64 - 14.01), having a low socioeconomic status (AOR = 2.50, 95% CI: 1.04 - 4.12), not receiving support from family members (AOR= 2.65; 95% CI: 1.60 - 4.32) and family history of psychological distress (AOR= 2.3; 95% CI: 1.01 - 4.02) significantly increased the odds of being psychologically distressed. Conclusion: The study found high rates of psychological distress among tuberculosis patients. Improved training of providers in screening for psychological distress, appropriate referral to relevant health practitioners and providing comprehensive treatment for patients with TB who are co-infected with HIV is essential to improve their health outcomes.

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