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Kern MJ ed. The Cardiac Catheterization Handbook, 5th ed. Philadephia, PA: Elsevier; 2011.

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Article

Vagal-induced Complete Heart Block during Coronary Angiography due to Bladder Distention

1Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Medicine, State University of New York Health Sciences University, Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY 11203, U.S.A.

2Department of Internal Medicine, State University of New York Health Sciences University, Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY 11203, U.S.A.


American Journal of Medical Case Reports. 2020, Vol. 8 No. 2, 56-59
DOI: 10.12691/ajmcr-8-2-5
Copyright © 2020 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Lyudmila Aurora, Abid Ullah, Pramod Theetha Kariyanna, Oleg Yurevich, Harshith Priyan Chandrakumar, Erdal Cavusoglu, Jonathan D. Marmur, Isabel M. McFarlane. Vagal-induced Complete Heart Block during Coronary Angiography due to Bladder Distention. American Journal of Medical Case Reports. 2020; 8(2):56-59. doi: 10.12691/ajmcr-8-2-5.

Correspondence to: Isabel  M. McFarlane, Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Medicine, State University of New York Health Sciences University, Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY 11203, U.S.A.. Email: isabel.mcfarlane@downstate.edu

Abstract

Vagal stimulation is common during angiographic procedures. A vasovagal reaction in the setting of coronary angiography most commonly presents as hypotension and/or bradycardia. While the array of signs and symptoms of vasovagal reactions are known, atrioventricular (AV) block maybe overlooked due to its intermittent nature. Below we describe a case of a 47 year-old female who presented with transient complete AV block, mediated by a vagal reaction due to bladder distention in the setting of an invasive coronary angiography procedure.

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