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Sani, F. M., Nasir, I. A., & Torhile, G. Mycological evaluation of smoked-dried fish sold at Maiduguri Metropolis, Nigeria: preliminary findings and potential health implications. European Journal of Health Science, 2(1), 5-10. June 2016.

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Article

Mycoflora and Public Health Risks of Smoked Fish Sold in Port Harcourt Markets, Nigeria

1Department of Microbiology, Rivers State University, Nkpolu-Oroworukwo, Port Harcourt, 500272 Rivers State, Nigeria

2Natural Science Unit, School of General Studies, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, 410002, Enugu State, Nigeria


American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2019, Vol. 7 No. 3, 78-82
DOI: 10.12691/ajmr-7-3-2
Copyright © 2019 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Akani Nedie Patience, Nwankwo Chidiebele Emmanuel Ikechukwu. Mycoflora and Public Health Risks of Smoked Fish Sold in Port Harcourt Markets, Nigeria. American Journal of Microbiological Research. 2019; 7(3):78-82. doi: 10.12691/ajmr-7-3-2.

Correspondence to: Akani  Nedie Patience, Department of Microbiology, Rivers State University, Nkpolu-Oroworukwo, Port Harcourt, 500272 Rivers State, Nigeria. Email: akani.nedie@ust.edu.ng

Abstract

Fish is a preferred source of protein globally, especially in developing countries like Nigeria. It is a savoured protein source in the Niger Delta, including Port Harcourt. Smoking is used to preserve fish by reducing its moisture content with a view to improved shelf life. This study aimed at determining the Mycoflora and the Public Health risks of smoked fish sold in Port Harcourt Markets. A total of 54 fish samples were collected from three strategic markets; Mile one, Oil Mill and Creek Road markets. Fish collected consists of 6 different species; Gadus morhua, Pseudotolithus typhus, Lutijanus goreensis, Ethalmosa fimbriata, Pseudotolithus senegalensis and Dasyatis pastinaca. All samples were grouped accordingly. Mycological study of fish samples was done using standard methods on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar. There was a significant difference in the mycoflora counts of smoked fish from different markets (p<0.05). Fungal load ranged from 1.23±0.08 x103 sfu/g in Lutjanus goreensis to 8.89±0.10 x 103 sfu/g in Gadus morhua, at Creek road market. From Mile 1 market, Lutjanus goreensis still hosted the highest population of 13.25±0.7 x 103 sfu/g and Dasyatis pastinaca had the least; 0.66±0.01 x 103 sfu/g. At Oil mill market, Ethalmosa fimbriata hosted 13.23±0.47 x 103 sfu/g while Gadus morhua had 0.77±0.02 x 103sfu/g. The fungal load in all fish from all three markets were significantly high for food and calls for attention. Nine fungal genera; Saccharomyces spp, Rhizopus spp, Penicillium spp, Mucor spp, Fusarium spp, Cladosporium spp, Candida spp, Absidia spp and Aspergillus spp, were isolated. All six fish species studied recorded more than 50 % occurrence of fungal species in all the markets. The mycoflora of smoked fish sold in Port Harcourt markets suggest significant public health risks. The need for improved storage and handling of this important protein source is high towards reduced public health risk. Proper preparation method, such as boiling, is strongly advocated.

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