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Volpe JJ. Intracranial hemorrhage in early infancy--renewed importance of vitamin K deficiency. Pediatr Neurol. 2014 Jun; 50(6): 545-6.

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Article

A Case Report of Intraoperative Coagulopathy Secondary to Chronic Vitamin K Deficiency

1Department of Internal Medicine, Kings County Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, 11203, USA

2Saint James School of Medicine St. Vincent, Cane Hall Road, Arnos Vale, St Vincent & the Grenadines

3Department of Hematology and Oncology, Kings County Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, 11203, USA


American Journal of Medical Case Reports. 2019, Vol. 7 No. 8, 167-169
DOI: 10.12691/ajmcr-7-8-4
Copyright © 2019 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Michael Haddadin, Mohammed Al-Sadawi, Sally Madanat, Devon S McKenzie, Robert Lewis, Samy I McFarlane. A Case Report of Intraoperative Coagulopathy Secondary to Chronic Vitamin K Deficiency. American Journal of Medical Case Reports. 2019; 7(8):167-169. doi: 10.12691/ajmcr-7-8-4.

Correspondence to: Samy  I McFarlane, Department of Internal Medicine, Kings County Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, 11203, USA. Email: Samy.mcfarlane@downstate.edu

Abstract

Dietary Vitamin K is a well-known anti-hemorrhagic agent that plays an integral role in the coagulation pathway. Vitamin K is involved in synthesis of coagulation factors; II, VII, IX and factor X. Vitamin K deficiency leads to bleeding diathesis. Hemorrhages usually present in deep soft tissue, rather than mucosal or epithelial membranes, bleeding that is generally caused by disorders of platelets. Major causes of vitamin K deficiency include; medications and diseases involving fat metabolism with a resultant fat malabsorption. Warfarin and Cephalosporins are one of the commonly prescribed medications that lead to vitamin K deficiency. Disease affecting fat metabolism pathway, such as; diseases of the pancreas (cystic fibrosis), short gut syndrome and certain pathologies of the biliary tree. Vitamin K deficiency is more common in newborns. In adults it is uncommon because of its ubiquitous nature and the abundance of its sources. Hemorrhagic disorders in adults due to Vitamin K deficiency are not commonly encountered in practice. We are presenting a case of an adult who presented with a compartment syndrome secondary to a traumatic intramuscular bleeding. Our case highlights the importance of considering vitamin K deficiency in the differential diagnosis of unexplained hemorrhages resulting from a coagulopathy.

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