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Wortmann, C.S. & D.J. Allen (1994). African bean production environments: their definition, characteristics and constraints. Network on Bean Research in Africa, Occasional Paper Series No. 11, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

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Article

Genotype x Environment Interactions on Seed Yield of Inter-racial Common Bean Lines in Kenya

1Department of Plant Science and Crop Protection, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 29053-00625, Nairobi, Kenya

2Faculty of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Université Evangélique en Afrique (UEA), P.O. Box 3323, Bukavu, Democratic Republic of Congo


World Journal of Agricultural Research. 2019, Vol. 7 No. 3, 76-87
DOI: 10.12691/wjar-7-3-1
Copyright © 2019 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Jean M. Mondo, Paul M. Kimani, Rama D. Narla. Genotype x Environment Interactions on Seed Yield of Inter-racial Common Bean Lines in Kenya. World Journal of Agricultural Research. 2019; 7(3):76-87. doi: 10.12691/wjar-7-3-1.

Correspondence to: Jean  M. Mondo, Department of Plant Science and Crop Protection, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 29053-00625, Nairobi, Kenya. Email: mondo.mubalama@yahoo.fr, mondo.mubalama@uea.ac.cd

Abstract

Determination of yield stability is critical in identifying new common bean cultivars with either specific or broad adaptation in target environments. This study aimed to assess genotype by environment (G x E) effects on agronomic performance of 78 F1.7 lines selected with molecular markers for multiple disease resistance from 16 inter-racial bean populations. Field trials were conducted in low-, medium- and high altitude conditions in Kenya. Data collected on seed yield were subjected to additive main-effects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI) model to separate additive variance from the G x E interaction and to determine the stability of genotypes across locations. Results showed that G x E effects were highly significant (P<0.001), implying that tested lines behaved differently across the three locations. Better yields were recorded from high altitude Tigoni site while the lowest were from low altitude Mwea site. Yield across sites ranged from 1,518 to 2,748; 1,324 to 3,860; 1,537 to 3,722 and 1,010 to 3,718 kg ha-1 for pinto, red mottled, red kidney and mixed color bean lines, respectively. Number of pods plant-1 was the most strongly correlated to seed yield and could be, therefore, used as an indirect selection criterion for seed yield. The environment was responsible for the largest part of yield variability (86.4%, 84.8%, 82.3% and 49.5% for pinto, red kidney, red mottled and mixed color bean lines, respectively). KMA13-22-21 and KMA13-29-21 were the most stable high yielding lines across locations. Higher yielding lines were the most unstable across sites. Two pinto, four red kidney, 15 red mottled, and two mixed color lines did better than their corresponding checks with yield advantages of 7.6, 14.3, 71.5, and 34.9%, respectively. These lines should, therefore, be selected for further testing and release.

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