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Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. 1996 Feb 10; 347(8998): 369-71.

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Article

Celiac Disease and Neurological Manifestations of Gluten Sensitivity. What Do They Share in Common?

1Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Santiago, Chile

2Fellow, Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile


International Journal of Celiac Disease. 2018, Vol. 6 No. 3, 76-82
DOI: 10.12691/ijcd-6-3-5
Copyright © 2019 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Rubén Peña, Gabriela Román, Natalia Zuloaga, Magdalena Araya. Celiac Disease and Neurological Manifestations of Gluten Sensitivity. What Do They Share in Common?. International Journal of Celiac Disease. 2018; 6(3):76-82. doi: 10.12691/ijcd-6-3-5.

Correspondence to: Magdalena  Araya, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Santiago, Chile. Email: maraya@inta.uchile.cl

Abstract

Knowledge on the clinical, autoimmune, genetic and more recently microbiome and epigenetic interactions in celiac disease (CD) is consistently improving; however, the pathogenic mechanisms of neurological manifestations of gluten sensitivity (NMGS) and their potential relationship with CD remain unclear. Difficulties in assessing both conditions include their highly variable clinical manifestations and the insufficient sensitivity and specificities of currently available diagnostics tools. Patients with neurological manifestations that respond to gluten withdrawal may or may not present enteropathy and others having demonstrable mucosal damage may or may not respond to GFD. Current pathogenic hypotheses that may relate both conditions, the spectrum of clinical manifestations, diagnostic problems, including differences in types and subtypes of antibodies described for diagnosis and the effects of gluten-free diet are reviewed. The evidence show that decisions based on clinical data may be successful for patient management, but do not allow drawing conclusions on the relations between CD and NMGS.

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